Structural Constraints, Risky Lifestyles, and Repeat Victimization

Structural Constraints, Risky Lifestyles, and Repeat Victimization Objectives Research indicates that victims who make changes to their risky behavioral routines are better able to avoid being victimized again in the future. Nevertheless, some victims’ abilities to change their behaviors may be limited by what Hindelang et al. in Victims of personal crime: an empirical foundation for a theory of personal victimization. Ballinger, Cambridge (1978) referred to as ‘‘structural constraints.’’ To assess this issue, we determine: (1) whether victims who reside in communities characterized by structural constraints (e.g., concentrated disadvantage) are more likely to continue engaging in risky behaviors (e.g., offending, illicit drug use, and getting drunk) after being victimized; and (2) whether victims who continue to engage in risky lifestyles have an increased likelihood of repeat victimization. Methods Ten waves of data (spanning nearly 7 years) from the Pathways to Desistance Study are used, and multilevel models are estimated to examine changes to risky lifestyles and repeat victimization among a subsample of victims. Results Findings indicate that community-level structural constraints impose limits on the changes that victims make to their risky lifestyles, and that these changes influence repeat victimization. Conclusions We conclude that, in the context of repeat victimization, structural con- straints are both real and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Quantitative Criminology Springer Journals

Structural Constraints, Risky Lifestyles, and Repeat Victimization

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Criminology and Criminal Justice; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general; Sociology, general; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Statistics, general
ISSN
0748-4518
eISSN
1573-7799
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10940-016-9334-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives Research indicates that victims who make changes to their risky behavioral routines are better able to avoid being victimized again in the future. Nevertheless, some victims’ abilities to change their behaviors may be limited by what Hindelang et al. in Victims of personal crime: an empirical foundation for a theory of personal victimization. Ballinger, Cambridge (1978) referred to as ‘‘structural constraints.’’ To assess this issue, we determine: (1) whether victims who reside in communities characterized by structural constraints (e.g., concentrated disadvantage) are more likely to continue engaging in risky behaviors (e.g., offending, illicit drug use, and getting drunk) after being victimized; and (2) whether victims who continue to engage in risky lifestyles have an increased likelihood of repeat victimization. Methods Ten waves of data (spanning nearly 7 years) from the Pathways to Desistance Study are used, and multilevel models are estimated to examine changes to risky lifestyles and repeat victimization among a subsample of victims. Results Findings indicate that community-level structural constraints impose limits on the changes that victims make to their risky lifestyles, and that these changes influence repeat victimization. Conclusions We conclude that, in the context of repeat victimization, structural con- straints are both real and

Journal

Journal of Quantitative CriminologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 5, 2016

References

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