Stress-induced changes in the nitric oxide system of shore crabs living under different ecological conditions

Stress-induced changes in the nitric oxide system of shore crabs living under different... The NO synthesis system in the brain and hemolymph of shore crabs Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Decapoda: Varunidae) living under different ecological conditions was examined under normal conditions and under acute stress. Intact crabs sampled from an area with a high anthropogenic load had a higher initial level of NO compared to crabs from a relatively clean location. After acute damaging exposure, the dynamics of the NO system activity in crabs from different stations differed markedly. The number of NO-positive elements in the brain and the level of NO metabolites in the hemolymph dramatically increased immediately after injuries in all groups of crabs. One hour after acute exposure, the expression of inducible NO-synthase in the protocerebral neurons was observed in crabs inhabiting the chronically polluted area. These results demonstrate for the first time the influence of pollution on the activity of NO-ergic processes and the involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of behavioral defense response in crustaceans under acute stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Stress-induced changes in the nitric oxide system of shore crabs living under different ecological conditions

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1063074010030065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The NO synthesis system in the brain and hemolymph of shore crabs Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Decapoda: Varunidae) living under different ecological conditions was examined under normal conditions and under acute stress. Intact crabs sampled from an area with a high anthropogenic load had a higher initial level of NO compared to crabs from a relatively clean location. After acute damaging exposure, the dynamics of the NO system activity in crabs from different stations differed markedly. The number of NO-positive elements in the brain and the level of NO metabolites in the hemolymph dramatically increased immediately after injuries in all groups of crabs. One hour after acute exposure, the expression of inducible NO-synthase in the protocerebral neurons was observed in crabs inhabiting the chronically polluted area. These results demonstrate for the first time the influence of pollution on the activity of NO-ergic processes and the involvement of nitric oxide in the formation of behavioral defense response in crustaceans under acute stress.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 7, 2010

References

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