Stable carbon isotope ratio in xylotrophic fungi and their substrates

Stable carbon isotope ratio in xylotrophic fungi and their substrates Data on the ratio of stable carbon isotopes in xylotrophic fungi and their xylic substrates are presented for the first time. It is shown that coniferous substrates are more enriched in the heavy carbon isotope, compared to deciduous substrates. In both cases, however, their carbon isotope composition is characterized by low variability and does not correlate with the species or physiological type of decomposer fungus but shows a statistically significant correlation with the degree of wood mineralization. The ratio of stable carbon isotopes in the fungi depends on that in their substrates but is shifted in favor of the heavier isotope. This trophic shift lacks species specificity, is equally manifested in decomposers of deciduous and coniferous substrates, remains unchanged along the latitudinal climatic gradient, and is positively correlated with the carbon isotope composition of substrates, in the absence of correlation with the degree of their mineralization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Ecology Springer Journals

Stable carbon isotope ratio in xylotrophic fungi and their substrates

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/stable-carbon-isotope-ratio-in-xylotrophic-fungi-and-their-substrates-Ay6SeeRQ89
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology; Environment, general
ISSN
1067-4136
eISSN
1608-3334
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1067413614010093
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Data on the ratio of stable carbon isotopes in xylotrophic fungi and their xylic substrates are presented for the first time. It is shown that coniferous substrates are more enriched in the heavy carbon isotope, compared to deciduous substrates. In both cases, however, their carbon isotope composition is characterized by low variability and does not correlate with the species or physiological type of decomposer fungus but shows a statistically significant correlation with the degree of wood mineralization. The ratio of stable carbon isotopes in the fungi depends on that in their substrates but is shifted in favor of the heavier isotope. This trophic shift lacks species specificity, is equally manifested in decomposers of deciduous and coniferous substrates, remains unchanged along the latitudinal climatic gradient, and is positively correlated with the carbon isotope composition of substrates, in the absence of correlation with the degree of their mineralization.

Journal

Russian Journal of EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 29, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off