Stabilizing air dampers for hovering aerial robotics: design, insect-scale flight tests, and scaling

Stabilizing air dampers for hovering aerial robotics: design, insect-scale flight tests, and scaling Most hovering aircraft such as helicopters and animal-inspired flapping-wing flyers are dynamically unstable in flight, quickly tumbling in the absence of feedback control. The addition of feedback loops can stabilize, but at the cost of additional sensing and actuation components. This can add expense, weight, and complexity. An alternative to feedback is the use of passive mechanisms such as aerodynamic drag to stabilize attitude. Previous work has suggested that small aircraft can be stabilized by adding air dampers above and below the center of mass. We present flight tests of an insect-scale robot operating under this principle. When controlled to a constant altitude, it remains stably upright while undergoing cyclic attitude oscillations. To characterize these oscillations, we present a nonlinear analytic model derived from first principles that reproduces the observed behavior. Using numerical simulation, we analyze how changing damper size, position, mass, and midpoint offset affect these oscillations, building on previous work that considered only a single configuration. Our results indicate that only by increasing damper size can lateral oscillation amplitude be significantly reduced, at the cost of increased damper mass. Additionally, we show that as scale diminishes, the damper size must get relatively larger. This suggests that smaller damper-equipped robots must operate in low-wind areas or in boundary-layer flow near surfaces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autonomous Robots Springer Journals

Stabilizing air dampers for hovering aerial robotics: design, insect-scale flight tests, and scaling

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/stabilizing-air-dampers-for-hovering-aerial-robotics-design-insect-6kSxJjcGcz
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Engineering; Robotics and Automation; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); Computer Imaging, Vision, Pattern Recognition and Graphics; Control, Robotics, Mechatronics
ISSN
0929-5593
eISSN
1573-7527
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10514-017-9623-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most hovering aircraft such as helicopters and animal-inspired flapping-wing flyers are dynamically unstable in flight, quickly tumbling in the absence of feedback control. The addition of feedback loops can stabilize, but at the cost of additional sensing and actuation components. This can add expense, weight, and complexity. An alternative to feedback is the use of passive mechanisms such as aerodynamic drag to stabilize attitude. Previous work has suggested that small aircraft can be stabilized by adding air dampers above and below the center of mass. We present flight tests of an insect-scale robot operating under this principle. When controlled to a constant altitude, it remains stably upright while undergoing cyclic attitude oscillations. To characterize these oscillations, we present a nonlinear analytic model derived from first principles that reproduces the observed behavior. Using numerical simulation, we analyze how changing damper size, position, mass, and midpoint offset affect these oscillations, building on previous work that considered only a single configuration. Our results indicate that only by increasing damper size can lateral oscillation amplitude be significantly reduced, at the cost of increased damper mass. Additionally, we show that as scale diminishes, the damper size must get relatively larger. This suggests that smaller damper-equipped robots must operate in low-wind areas or in boundary-layer flow near surfaces.

Journal

Autonomous RobotsSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 28, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off