Spicules of hexactinellid sponges (Hexactinellida: Porifera) as natural composite materials

Spicules of hexactinellid sponges (Hexactinellida: Porifera) as natural composite materials This paper reviews studies on the hexactinellid glass sponges (Hexactinellida: Porifera) that have organic silica spicules. According to its physical properties (microdensity, Young’s modulus, and light transmission), the material of the spicules is similar to amorphous silica; however, sponge spicules are birefringent, which suggests that they have a highly ordered crystal-like nature. Mineralized remnants of siliceous spicules composed of chemically inert materials are preserved in sedimentary rocks and provide evidence of the ecological state of the ancient biosphere. Sponges occur in waters with low temperatures; therefore, they grow very slowly and live for hundreds of years. The organic silica spicules exhibit the capacity for triboluminescence. The generated light emission may be used by symbiotic bacteria on the spicule surface. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Marine Biology Springer Journals

Spicules of hexactinellid sponges (Hexactinellida: Porifera) as natural composite materials

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
1063-0740
eISSN
1608-3377
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1063074013040044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper reviews studies on the hexactinellid glass sponges (Hexactinellida: Porifera) that have organic silica spicules. According to its physical properties (microdensity, Young’s modulus, and light transmission), the material of the spicules is similar to amorphous silica; however, sponge spicules are birefringent, which suggests that they have a highly ordered crystal-like nature. Mineralized remnants of siliceous spicules composed of chemically inert materials are preserved in sedimentary rocks and provide evidence of the ecological state of the ancient biosphere. Sponges occur in waters with low temperatures; therefore, they grow very slowly and live for hundreds of years. The organic silica spicules exhibit the capacity for triboluminescence. The generated light emission may be used by symbiotic bacteria on the spicule surface.

Journal

Russian Journal of Marine BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 2013

References

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