Sperm biology and control of reproduction in sturgeon: (II) sperm morphology, acrosome reaction, motility and cryopreservation

Sperm biology and control of reproduction in sturgeon: (II) sperm morphology, acrosome reaction,... In the present review, sperm morphology, acrosome reaction, motility, short-term storage and cryopreservation are summarized and discussed in sturgeon (Chondrostei, Acipenseriformes). The elongated head of spermatozoon comprises an acrosome with 8–12 posterolateral projections. Usually three endonuclear canals are observed in the nucleus. Proximal and distal centrioles and 3–6 mitochondria are located in the midpiece region. The flagellum consists of an axoneme with a typical “9 + 2” structure of microtubules and presents a ribon-like structure due to two lateral membranous fins. Egg water, Ca2+ and Mg2+ can trigger acrosome reaction. Trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities are reported in sturgeon sperm. These physiological properties of sturgeon sperm are identified as serine activity with 33 kDa molecular mass and can be inhibited by their respective inhibitors. The K+ prevents sperm activation in seminal plasma, and hypo-osmolality or decrease of extracellular K+ triggers sperm activation. Extracellular Ca2+ is involved in flagellar beating pattern and sperm velocity. After activation, sperm motility, velocity, and flagellar beating frequency, wavelength and amplitude decrease, while number of waves and curvature increase. Sturgeon sperm can be stored for several days at 4 °C; however it is better to add K+ into the immobilizing medium because it prevents sperm activation during incubation. Regarding sperm cryopreservation, methanol is a better cryoprotectant than DMSO. Either short-term storage or cryopreservation of sperm generates damage to spermatozoa that lead to reduction of sperm motility performance. Some studies suggest using an activation medium containing Ca2+ for enhancing sperm motility performance of incubated or frozen-thawed sperm. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Sperm biology and control of reproduction in sturgeon: (II) sperm morphology, acrosome reaction, motility and cryopreservation

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-012-9270-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the present review, sperm morphology, acrosome reaction, motility, short-term storage and cryopreservation are summarized and discussed in sturgeon (Chondrostei, Acipenseriformes). The elongated head of spermatozoon comprises an acrosome with 8–12 posterolateral projections. Usually three endonuclear canals are observed in the nucleus. Proximal and distal centrioles and 3–6 mitochondria are located in the midpiece region. The flagellum consists of an axoneme with a typical “9 + 2” structure of microtubules and presents a ribon-like structure due to two lateral membranous fins. Egg water, Ca2+ and Mg2+ can trigger acrosome reaction. Trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities are reported in sturgeon sperm. These physiological properties of sturgeon sperm are identified as serine activity with 33 kDa molecular mass and can be inhibited by their respective inhibitors. The K+ prevents sperm activation in seminal plasma, and hypo-osmolality or decrease of extracellular K+ triggers sperm activation. Extracellular Ca2+ is involved in flagellar beating pattern and sperm velocity. After activation, sperm motility, velocity, and flagellar beating frequency, wavelength and amplitude decrease, while number of waves and curvature increase. Sturgeon sperm can be stored for several days at 4 °C; however it is better to add K+ into the immobilizing medium because it prevents sperm activation during incubation. Regarding sperm cryopreservation, methanol is a better cryoprotectant than DMSO. Either short-term storage or cryopreservation of sperm generates damage to spermatozoa that lead to reduction of sperm motility performance. Some studies suggest using an activation medium containing Ca2+ for enhancing sperm motility performance of incubated or frozen-thawed sperm.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 17, 2012

References

  • Sperm motility and fertilizing ability in the Persian sturgeon, Acipenser persicus
    Alavi, SMH; Cosson, J
  • Sperm motility in fishes: (I) effects of pH and temperature
    Alavi, SMH; Cosson, J
  • Chemical composition and osmolality of seminal fluid of Acipenser persicus; their physiological relationship with sperm motility
    Alavi, SMH; Cosson, J; Karami, M; Abdoulhay, H; Amiri, BM
  • Semen characteristics in Acipenser persicus in relation to sequential stripping
    Alavi, SMH; Cosson, J; Kazemi, R

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