Spatial patterns of wilting in sugar beet as an indicator for precision irrigation

Spatial patterns of wilting in sugar beet as an indicator for precision irrigation Precision irrigation requires the mapping of within-field variations of water requirement. Conventional remote sensing techniques provide estimates of water status at only shallow soil depths. The ability of a water sensitive crop, sugar beet, to act as an intermediate sensor providing an integrated measure of water status throughout its rooting depth is tested here. Archive aerial photographs and satellite imagery of Eastern England show crop patterns resulting from past periglacial processes. The patterns were found to be spatially and temporally consistent. Field sampling of soil cores to 1 m depth established that the within-field wilting zones were significantly associated with coarser or shallow soils. The stress classes, determined by classification of the digitised images, were weakly correlated with total available water (Pearson correlation r = 0.588, P < 0.05). These results suggest that wilting in sugar beet can be used as an intermediate sensor for quantifying potential soil water availability within the root zone. Within-field stress maps generated in 1 year could be applied as a strategic tool allowing precision irrigation to be applied to high-value crops in following years, helping to make more sustainable use of water resources. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Spatial patterns of wilting in sugar beet as an indicator for precision irrigation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/spatial-patterns-of-wilting-in-sugar-beet-as-an-indicator-for-luVEQliD0a
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-010-9177-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Precision irrigation requires the mapping of within-field variations of water requirement. Conventional remote sensing techniques provide estimates of water status at only shallow soil depths. The ability of a water sensitive crop, sugar beet, to act as an intermediate sensor providing an integrated measure of water status throughout its rooting depth is tested here. Archive aerial photographs and satellite imagery of Eastern England show crop patterns resulting from past periglacial processes. The patterns were found to be spatially and temporally consistent. Field sampling of soil cores to 1 m depth established that the within-field wilting zones were significantly associated with coarser or shallow soils. The stress classes, determined by classification of the digitised images, were weakly correlated with total available water (Pearson correlation r = 0.588, P < 0.05). These results suggest that wilting in sugar beet can be used as an intermediate sensor for quantifying potential soil water availability within the root zone. Within-field stress maps generated in 1 year could be applied as a strategic tool allowing precision irrigation to be applied to high-value crops in following years, helping to make more sustainable use of water resources.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2010

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off