Spatial distribution patterns of global natural disasters based on biclustering

Spatial distribution patterns of global natural disasters based on biclustering Understanding the spatial distribution patterns (SDPs) of natural disasters plays an essential role in reducing and minimizing natural disaster risks. An integrated discussion on the SDPs of multiple global disasters is still lacking. In addition, due to their high quantity and complexity, natural disasters constitute high-dimensional data that represent a challenge for an analysis of SDPs. This paper analyzed the SDPs of global disasters from 1980 to 2016 through biclustering. The results indicate that the SDPs of fatality rates are more uneven than those of occurrence rates. Based on the occurrence rates, the selected countries were clustered into four classes. (1) The major disasters along the northern Pacific and in the Caribbean Sea and Madagascar are storms, followed by floods. (2) Most of Africa is mainly affected by floods, epidemics, and droughts. (3) The primary disaster types in the Alpine-Himalayan belt and the western Andes are floods and earthquakes. (4) Europe, America, Oceania, and South and Southeast Asia are predominantly influenced by floods. In addition, according to the fatality rates, the selected countries were clustered into eight classes. (1) Extreme high temperatures mostly result in high fatality rates (HFRs) in developed countries. (2) Epidemics lead to HFRs in parts of Africa. (3) Droughts produce HFRs in East Africa. (4) Earthquakes result in HFRs along the eastern Pacific coastline and the Alpine-Himalayan belt. (5) Tsunamis mainly cause HFRs in Thailand, Indonesia, and Japan. (6) Storms result in scattered but distinct HFRs along the coastal regions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. (7) Floods cause concentrated HFRs in South Asia and northeastern South America. (8) Finally, volcanoes cause HFRs in Colombia, while extreme low temperatures cause HFRs in Ukraine and Poland. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Natural Hazards Springer Journals

Spatial distribution patterns of global natural disasters based on biclustering

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Earth Sciences; Natural Hazards; Hydrogeology; Geophysics/Geodesy; Geotechnical Engineering & Applied Earth Sciences; Civil Engineering; Environmental Management
ISSN
0921-030X
eISSN
1573-0840
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11069-018-3279-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Understanding the spatial distribution patterns (SDPs) of natural disasters plays an essential role in reducing and minimizing natural disaster risks. An integrated discussion on the SDPs of multiple global disasters is still lacking. In addition, due to their high quantity and complexity, natural disasters constitute high-dimensional data that represent a challenge for an analysis of SDPs. This paper analyzed the SDPs of global disasters from 1980 to 2016 through biclustering. The results indicate that the SDPs of fatality rates are more uneven than those of occurrence rates. Based on the occurrence rates, the selected countries were clustered into four classes. (1) The major disasters along the northern Pacific and in the Caribbean Sea and Madagascar are storms, followed by floods. (2) Most of Africa is mainly affected by floods, epidemics, and droughts. (3) The primary disaster types in the Alpine-Himalayan belt and the western Andes are floods and earthquakes. (4) Europe, America, Oceania, and South and Southeast Asia are predominantly influenced by floods. In addition, according to the fatality rates, the selected countries were clustered into eight classes. (1) Extreme high temperatures mostly result in high fatality rates (HFRs) in developed countries. (2) Epidemics lead to HFRs in parts of Africa. (3) Droughts produce HFRs in East Africa. (4) Earthquakes result in HFRs along the eastern Pacific coastline and the Alpine-Himalayan belt. (5) Tsunamis mainly cause HFRs in Thailand, Indonesia, and Japan. (6) Storms result in scattered but distinct HFRs along the coastal regions of the Pacific and Indian Oceans. (7) Floods cause concentrated HFRs in South Asia and northeastern South America. (8) Finally, volcanoes cause HFRs in Colombia, while extreme low temperatures cause HFRs in Ukraine and Poland.

Journal

Natural HazardsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 24, 2018

References

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