Spatial and temporal patterns of GUS expression directed by 5′ regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana farnesyl diphosphate synthase genes FPS1 and FPS2

Spatial and temporal patterns of GUS expression directed by 5′ regions of the Arabidopsis... Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS), the enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), is considered a regulatory enzyme of plant isoprenoid biosynthesis. The promoter regions of the FPS1 and FPS2 genes controlling the expression of isoforms FPS1S and FPS2, respectively, were fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The FPS1S:GUS gene is widely expressed in all plant tissues throughout development, thus supporting a role for FPS1S in the synthesis of isoprenoids serving basic plant cell functions. In contrast, the FPS2:GUS gene shows a pattern of expression restricted to specific organs at particular stages of development. The highest levels of GUS activity are detected in flowers, especially in pollen grains, from the early stages of flower development. After pollination, much lower levels of GUS activity are detected in the rest of floral organs, with the exception of the ovary valves, which remain unstained throughout flower development. GUS activity is also detected in developing and mature seeds. In roots, GUS expression is primarily detected at sites of lateral root initiation and in junctions between primary and secondary roots. No GUS activity is detected in root apical meristems. GUS expression is also observed in junctions between primary and secondary stems. Overall, the pattern of expression of FPS2:GUS suggests a role for FPS2 in the synthesis of particular isoprenoids with specialized functions. Functional FPS2 gene promoter deletion analysis in transfected protoplasts and transgenic A. thaliana plants indicate that all the cis-acting elements required to establish the full pattern of expression of the FPS2 gene are contained in a short region extending from positions −111 to +65. The potential regulatory role of specific sequences within this region is discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Spatial and temporal patterns of GUS expression directed by 5′ regions of the Arabidopsis thaliana farnesyl diphosphate synthase genes FPS1 and FPS2

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1026588708849
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS), the enzyme that catalyses the synthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), is considered a regulatory enzyme of plant isoprenoid biosynthesis. The promoter regions of the FPS1 and FPS2 genes controlling the expression of isoforms FPS1S and FPS2, respectively, were fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana plants. The FPS1S:GUS gene is widely expressed in all plant tissues throughout development, thus supporting a role for FPS1S in the synthesis of isoprenoids serving basic plant cell functions. In contrast, the FPS2:GUS gene shows a pattern of expression restricted to specific organs at particular stages of development. The highest levels of GUS activity are detected in flowers, especially in pollen grains, from the early stages of flower development. After pollination, much lower levels of GUS activity are detected in the rest of floral organs, with the exception of the ovary valves, which remain unstained throughout flower development. GUS activity is also detected in developing and mature seeds. In roots, GUS expression is primarily detected at sites of lateral root initiation and in junctions between primary and secondary roots. No GUS activity is detected in root apical meristems. GUS expression is also observed in junctions between primary and secondary stems. Overall, the pattern of expression of FPS2:GUS suggests a role for FPS2 in the synthesis of particular isoprenoids with specialized functions. Functional FPS2 gene promoter deletion analysis in transfected protoplasts and transgenic A. thaliana plants indicate that all the cis-acting elements required to establish the full pattern of expression of the FPS2 gene are contained in a short region extending from positions −111 to +65. The potential regulatory role of specific sequences within this region is discussed.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References

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