Sorting of proteins to vacuoles in plant cells

Sorting of proteins to vacuoles in plant cells An individual plant cell may contain at least two functionally and structurally distinct types of vacuoles: protein storage vacuoles and lytic vacuoles. Presumably a cell that stores proteins in vacuoles must maintain these separate compartments to prevent exposure of the storage proteins to an acidified environment with active hydrolytic enzymes where they would be degraded. Thus, the organization of the secretory pathway in plant cells, which includes the vacuoles, has a fascinating complexity not anticipated from the extensive genetic and biochemical studies of the secretory pathway in yeast. Plant cells must generate the membranes to form two separate types of tonoplast, maintain them as separate organelles, and direct soluble proteins from the secretory flow specifically to one or the other via separate vesicular pathways. Individual soluble and membrane proteins must be recognized and sorted into one or the other pathway by distinct, specific mechanisms. Here we review the emerging picture of how separate plant vacuoles are organized structurally and how proteins are recognized and sorted to each type. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Sorting of proteins to vacuoles in plant cells

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/sorting-of-proteins-to-vacuoles-in-plant-cells-ygOtdbOBQx
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1006032627036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An individual plant cell may contain at least two functionally and structurally distinct types of vacuoles: protein storage vacuoles and lytic vacuoles. Presumably a cell that stores proteins in vacuoles must maintain these separate compartments to prevent exposure of the storage proteins to an acidified environment with active hydrolytic enzymes where they would be degraded. Thus, the organization of the secretory pathway in plant cells, which includes the vacuoles, has a fascinating complexity not anticipated from the extensive genetic and biochemical studies of the secretory pathway in yeast. Plant cells must generate the membranes to form two separate types of tonoplast, maintain them as separate organelles, and direct soluble proteins from the secretory flow specifically to one or the other via separate vesicular pathways. Individual soluble and membrane proteins must be recognized and sorted into one or the other pathway by distinct, specific mechanisms. Here we review the emerging picture of how separate plant vacuoles are organized structurally and how proteins are recognized and sorted to each type.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off