Socioeconomic status and treatment of depression during pregnancy: a retrospective population-based cohort study in British Columbia, Canada

Socioeconomic status and treatment of depression during pregnancy: a retrospective... Women at the lower end of the socioeconomic distribution have higher rates of depression in pregnancy; however, we know little about the role of socioeconomic status (SES) in determining their treatment. Herein, we investigate the relationships between income and the use of health services for depression in pregnancy. This retrospective cohort study using population-based administrative datasets included all women who delivered a live infant in the province of British Columbia, Canada (population of 4.3 million) between April 1st, 2000 and December 31st, 2009. We restricted to women with an indication of depression during pregnancy and examined their use of health services to treat depression by income quintile. Women in the highest income quintile were significantly more likely to see a psychiatrist for depression during pregnancy and to fill prescriptions for serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants than women in the lowest income quintile. Women at the lower end of the income distribution were more likely to have a GP visit for depression. Women at the low end of the income distribution were more likely to end up in hospital for depression or a mental health condition during pregnancy and more likely to receive a benzodiazepine and/or an antipsychotic medication. Our findings suggest a critical gap in access to health services for women of lower income suffering from depression during pregnancy, a time when proper access to effective treatment has the most potential to improve the long-term health of the developing child and the whole family unit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Women's Mental Health Springer Journals

Socioeconomic status and treatment of depression during pregnancy: a retrospective population-based cohort study in British Columbia, Canada

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Psychotherapy
ISSN
1434-1816
eISSN
1435-1102
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00737-018-0866-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Women at the lower end of the socioeconomic distribution have higher rates of depression in pregnancy; however, we know little about the role of socioeconomic status (SES) in determining their treatment. Herein, we investigate the relationships between income and the use of health services for depression in pregnancy. This retrospective cohort study using population-based administrative datasets included all women who delivered a live infant in the province of British Columbia, Canada (population of 4.3 million) between April 1st, 2000 and December 31st, 2009. We restricted to women with an indication of depression during pregnancy and examined their use of health services to treat depression by income quintile. Women in the highest income quintile were significantly more likely to see a psychiatrist for depression during pregnancy and to fill prescriptions for serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants than women in the lowest income quintile. Women at the lower end of the income distribution were more likely to have a GP visit for depression. Women at the low end of the income distribution were more likely to end up in hospital for depression or a mental health condition during pregnancy and more likely to receive a benzodiazepine and/or an antipsychotic medication. Our findings suggest a critical gap in access to health services for women of lower income suffering from depression during pregnancy, a time when proper access to effective treatment has the most potential to improve the long-term health of the developing child and the whole family unit.

Journal

Archives of Women's Mental HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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