Socioeconomic Inequalities and Self-Rated Health: A Multilevel Study of Italian Elderly

Socioeconomic Inequalities and Self-Rated Health: A Multilevel Study of Italian Elderly We adopted a multilevel approach in order to provide a comprehensive overview of the main social and economic differences associated with inequalities in self-rated health, according to the territorial context of residence. We focused on the Italian population aged 65 and over, availing of the most recent data on health conditions in Italy. This study proves the persistence in Italy, a modern welfare state that has one of the best overall healthcare systems in the world, of significant, if not enormous, socioeconomic differences in self-perceived health among the elderly. We found that each component of the socioeconomic status is autonomously correlated with individual perceptions of health, highlighting the importance of considering all of the facets of the individual socioeconomic status in measuring the extent of health inequalities. The lack of a network of relationships was also found to be strongly associated with a poor health status for elderly Italians. Our study also documented the presence of a contextual effect. The proposed multilevel modeling proved to be useful in shedding light on relevant aspects in the field of perceived health and for avoiding misleading results. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Socioeconomic Inequalities and Self-Rated Health: A Multilevel Study of Italian Elderly

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/socioeconomic-inequalities-and-self-rated-health-a-multilevel-study-of-3MZ0HKe0S0
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-011-9219-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

References

  • Contextual-effects models: Theoretical and methodological issues
    Blalock, HM
  • Social selection: What does it contribute to social class differences in health?
    Blane, D; Davey Smith, G; Bartley, M
  • Social class and self-rated health: Can the gradient be explained by differences in life style or work environment?
    Borg, V; Kristensen, TS

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial