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Sleeve Gastrectomy after Renal Transplantation

Sleeve Gastrectomy after Renal Transplantation Background Obesity induces or accelerates diabetes (DBT), hypertension (HT), and dyslipidemia (DSL), which are the main causes of renal failure. Obesity exacerbates in patients after renal transplantation (RT), and it has been associated with increased mortality rate, postoperative complications, and graft loss. We hypothesize that bariatric surgery might have a positive effect on obese patients with history of previous RT. Methods This was a retrospective review from prospectively collected data. Patients with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with history of RT were studied. Demographics, anthropometric data, effect on comorbidities, postoperative course, immunosuppressive treatment, reason for transplantation, kidney function, graft survival, and quality of life associated with SG in obese patients with previous RT were assessed using a survey. Results From January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2016, five kidney transplant patients were operated on; 80% were female, with an average preoperative BMI of 42.18 ± 8.5 kg/m (range 37–54). Related comorbidities: 100% of the patients had HT and DSL, whereas 40% had DBT and gout. The average time gap between RT and SG was 15 ± 8.4 years (range 3–22). Average operative time was 65 ± 12 min (range 60–85), and there were neither complications nor mortality. At 16.8 ± 14.5 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obesity Surgery Springer Journals

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References (61)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Surgery
ISSN
0960-8923
eISSN
1708-0428
DOI
10.1007/s11695-017-3056-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Obesity induces or accelerates diabetes (DBT), hypertension (HT), and dyslipidemia (DSL), which are the main causes of renal failure. Obesity exacerbates in patients after renal transplantation (RT), and it has been associated with increased mortality rate, postoperative complications, and graft loss. We hypothesize that bariatric surgery might have a positive effect on obese patients with history of previous RT. Methods This was a retrospective review from prospectively collected data. Patients with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with history of RT were studied. Demographics, anthropometric data, effect on comorbidities, postoperative course, immunosuppressive treatment, reason for transplantation, kidney function, graft survival, and quality of life associated with SG in obese patients with previous RT were assessed using a survey. Results From January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2016, five kidney transplant patients were operated on; 80% were female, with an average preoperative BMI of 42.18 ± 8.5 kg/m (range 37–54). Related comorbidities: 100% of the patients had HT and DSL, whereas 40% had DBT and gout. The average time gap between RT and SG was 15 ± 8.4 years (range 3–22). Average operative time was 65 ± 12 min (range 60–85), and there were neither complications nor mortality. At 16.8 ± 14.5

Journal

Obesity SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 2, 2018

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