Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation

Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6–18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p values<0.05) but not objective sleep indices. Results suggest that many HCT recipients experience sleep disruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bone Marrow Transplantation Springer Journals

Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation

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Publisher
Nature Publishing Group UK
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s) 2017, under exclusive licence to Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Internal Medicine; Cell Biology; Public Health; Hematology; Stem Cells
ISSN
0268-3369
eISSN
1476-5365
D.O.I.
10.1038/s41409-017-0022-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6–18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p values<0.05) but not objective sleep indices. Results suggest that many HCT recipients experience sleep disruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

Journal

Bone Marrow TransplantationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 21, 2017

References

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