Size-Dependent Selective Leaf Damage by Insects and Some Methodological Implications of This Phenomenon

Size-Dependent Selective Leaf Damage by Insects and Some Methodological Implications of This... The area of leaves on birch (Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa) auxiblasts and brachyblasts and the degree of their damage by the complex of leaf-gnawing and leaf-mining insects were studied in a light birch forest. The results showed that phyllophagous insects, primarily snout beetles, prefer young leaves on the apexes of auxiblasts. Thus, selective damage is inflicted on smaller leaves, both on the auxiblasts and in the entire sample. This phenomenon is widespread and may manifest itself in different ways, depending on the pattern of leaf area distribution along the extended shoot and the feeding preferences of the insects. Thus, it is necessary to reconsider research methods and approaches based on the assumption that insects damage leaves nonselectively, irrespective of their size. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Ecology Springer Journals

Size-Dependent Selective Leaf Damage by Insects and Some Methodological Implications of This Phenomenon

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology
ISSN
1067-4136
eISSN
1608-3334
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1020907732510
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The area of leaves on birch (Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa) auxiblasts and brachyblasts and the degree of their damage by the complex of leaf-gnawing and leaf-mining insects were studied in a light birch forest. The results showed that phyllophagous insects, primarily snout beetles, prefer young leaves on the apexes of auxiblasts. Thus, selective damage is inflicted on smaller leaves, both on the auxiblasts and in the entire sample. This phenomenon is widespread and may manifest itself in different ways, depending on the pattern of leaf area distribution along the extended shoot and the feeding preferences of the insects. Thus, it is necessary to reconsider research methods and approaches based on the assumption that insects damage leaves nonselectively, irrespective of their size.

Journal

Russian Journal of EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

References

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