Site-specific fertilizer nitrogen management in irrigated transplanted rice (Oryza sativa) using an optical sensor

Site-specific fertilizer nitrogen management in irrigated transplanted rice (Oryza sativa) using... Blanket fertilizer nitrogen (N) recommendations for large irrigated transplanted rice tracts lead to low N use-efficiency (NUE) due to field-to-field variability in soil N supply and seasonal variability in yield. To achieve high NUE, a fertilizer N management strategy based on visible and near-infrared spectral response from plant canopies using a GreenSeeker™ optical sensor was evaluated. Seven field experiments were conducted during 2005–2007 at two locations in the Indo-Gangetic plains of South Asia to define relationships between in-season sensor measurements at panicle initiation (PI) stage and up to 2 weeks later, and yield of rice. During 2006–2010, seven field experiments were conducted to assess the sensor-based N management strategy and to work out the prescriptive N management to be followed prior to applying sensor-guided fertilizer dose. During 2010 and 2011, the sensor- based N management strategy was evaluated versus farmers’ fertilizer practice at 19 on-farm locations. Relationships with R2 values 0.51 (n = 131), 0.45 (n = 74) and 0.49 (n = 131), respectively, were observed between in-season sensor-based estimates of yield at 42 (PI stage), 49 and 56 days after transplanting of rice and actual grain yield of rice. Applications of 30 kg N ha−1 at transplanting and 45 kg N ha−1 at active tillering stage were found to be the appropriate prescriptive strategy before applying the GreenSeeker-guided dose at PI stage. Sensor-guided N management resulted in similar grain yields as the blanket rate farmer practice, but with reduced N rates, i.e. greater recovery efficiency (by 5.5–21.7 %) and agronomic efficiency [by 4.7–11.7 kg grain (kg N applied)−1]. This study revealed that high yields coupled with high NUE in transplanted rice can be achieved by replacing blanket fertilizer recommendation by an optical sensor-based N management strategy consisting of applying a moderate amount of fertilizer N at transplanting and enough fertilizer N to meet the high N demand during the period between active tillering and PI before applying a sensor-guided fertilizer N dose at PI stage of rice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Site-specific fertilizer nitrogen management in irrigated transplanted rice (Oryza sativa) using an optical sensor

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-015-9389-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Blanket fertilizer nitrogen (N) recommendations for large irrigated transplanted rice tracts lead to low N use-efficiency (NUE) due to field-to-field variability in soil N supply and seasonal variability in yield. To achieve high NUE, a fertilizer N management strategy based on visible and near-infrared spectral response from plant canopies using a GreenSeeker™ optical sensor was evaluated. Seven field experiments were conducted during 2005–2007 at two locations in the Indo-Gangetic plains of South Asia to define relationships between in-season sensor measurements at panicle initiation (PI) stage and up to 2 weeks later, and yield of rice. During 2006–2010, seven field experiments were conducted to assess the sensor-based N management strategy and to work out the prescriptive N management to be followed prior to applying sensor-guided fertilizer dose. During 2010 and 2011, the sensor- based N management strategy was evaluated versus farmers’ fertilizer practice at 19 on-farm locations. Relationships with R2 values 0.51 (n = 131), 0.45 (n = 74) and 0.49 (n = 131), respectively, were observed between in-season sensor-based estimates of yield at 42 (PI stage), 49 and 56 days after transplanting of rice and actual grain yield of rice. Applications of 30 kg N ha−1 at transplanting and 45 kg N ha−1 at active tillering stage were found to be the appropriate prescriptive strategy before applying the GreenSeeker-guided dose at PI stage. Sensor-guided N management resulted in similar grain yields as the blanket rate farmer practice, but with reduced N rates, i.e. greater recovery efficiency (by 5.5–21.7 %) and agronomic efficiency [by 4.7–11.7 kg grain (kg N applied)−1]. This study revealed that high yields coupled with high NUE in transplanted rice can be achieved by replacing blanket fertilizer recommendation by an optical sensor-based N management strategy consisting of applying a moderate amount of fertilizer N at transplanting and enough fertilizer N to meet the high N demand during the period between active tillering and PI before applying a sensor-guided fertilizer N dose at PI stage of rice.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 1, 2015

References

  • On-farm N supply and N nutrition in the rice–wheat system of Nepal and Bangladesh
    Adhikari, C; Bronson, KF; Panaullah, GM; Regmi, AP; Saha, PK; Dobermann, A
  • Prediction of dry direct-seeded rice yields using chlorophyll meter, leaf color chart and GreenSeeker optical sensor in northwestern India
    Ali, AM; Thind, HS; Sharma, S; Varinderpal-Singh
  • Canopy reflectance response to plant nitrogen accumulation in rice
    Bajwa, S; Mishra, AR; Norman, RJ
  • Assessment of the nitrogen management strategy using an optical sensor for irrigated wheat
    Bijay-Singh; Sharma, RK; Jaspreet-Kaur; Jat, ML; Martin, KL; Yadvinder-Singh
  • Fixed-time adjustable dose site-specific fertilizer nitrogen management in transplanted irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L.) in South Asia
    Bijay-Singh; Varinderpal-Singh; Yadvinder-Singh; Thind, HS; Ajay-Kumar; Gupta, RK

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