Simultaneous effect of dissolved organic carbon, surfactant, and organic acid on the desorption of pesticides investigated by response surface methodology

Simultaneous effect of dissolved organic carbon, surfactant, and organic acid on the desorption... Desorption of pesticides (fenobucarb, endosulfan, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)) from soil to aqueous solution with the simultaneous presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium oxalate (Oxa) was investigated in batch test by applying a full factorial design and the Box–Behnken response surface methodology (RSM). Five concentration levels of DOC (8 to 92 mg L−1), SDS (0 to 6.4 critical micelle concentration (CMC)), and Oxa (0 to 0.15 M) were used for the experiments with a rice field topsoil. The results of RSM analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) have shown that the experimental data could be well described by quadratic regression equations with determination coefficients (R 2) of 0.990, 0.976, and 0.984 for desorption of fenobucarb, endosulfan, and DDT, respectively. The individual effects and interaction of DOC, SDS, and Oxa were evaluated through quadratic regression equations. When the aqueous solution includes 50 mg L−1 DOC, 3.75 CMC SDS, and 0.1 M Oxa, the maximum desorption concentrations of fenobucarb, endosulfan, and DDT were 96, 80, and 75 μg L−1, respectively. The lowest concentration of SDS, DOC, and Oxa caused the minimum desorption. This point at conditions of concern for flooding water is high content of organic compounds causing potentially high contamination by desorption, and the remarkably lower desorption at organic matter-free conditions. The suspended organic matter is one of the common characteristics of flooding and irrigation water in rice fields, and surfactants from pollution increase the problem with desorption of legacy pesticides in the rice fields. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Simultaneous effect of dissolved organic carbon, surfactant, and organic acid on the desorption of pesticides investigated by response surface methodology

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-9431-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Desorption of pesticides (fenobucarb, endosulfan, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)) from soil to aqueous solution with the simultaneous presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium oxalate (Oxa) was investigated in batch test by applying a full factorial design and the Box–Behnken response surface methodology (RSM). Five concentration levels of DOC (8 to 92 mg L−1), SDS (0 to 6.4 critical micelle concentration (CMC)), and Oxa (0 to 0.15 M) were used for the experiments with a rice field topsoil. The results of RSM analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA) have shown that the experimental data could be well described by quadratic regression equations with determination coefficients (R 2) of 0.990, 0.976, and 0.984 for desorption of fenobucarb, endosulfan, and DDT, respectively. The individual effects and interaction of DOC, SDS, and Oxa were evaluated through quadratic regression equations. When the aqueous solution includes 50 mg L−1 DOC, 3.75 CMC SDS, and 0.1 M Oxa, the maximum desorption concentrations of fenobucarb, endosulfan, and DDT were 96, 80, and 75 μg L−1, respectively. The lowest concentration of SDS, DOC, and Oxa caused the minimum desorption. This point at conditions of concern for flooding water is high content of organic compounds causing potentially high contamination by desorption, and the remarkably lower desorption at organic matter-free conditions. The suspended organic matter is one of the common characteristics of flooding and irrigation water in rice fields, and surfactants from pollution increase the problem with desorption of legacy pesticides in the rice fields.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 2, 2017

References

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