Simplification of the Gardner model: effects on maximum upward flux in the presence of a shallow water table

Simplification of the Gardner model: effects on maximum upward flux in the presence of a shallow... The maximum upward flux (E max) is a control condition for the development of groundwater evaporation models, which can be predicted through the Gardner model. A high-precision E max prediction helps to improve irrigation practice. When using the Gardner model, it has widely been accepted to ignore parameter b (a soil-water constant) for model simplification. However, this may affect the prediction accuracy; therefore, how parameter b affects E max requires detailed investigation. An indoor one-dimensional soil-column evaporation experiment was conducted to observe E max in the presence of a water table of depth 50 cm. The study consisted of 13 treatments based on four solutes and three concentrations in groundwater: KCl, NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2, with concentrations of 5, 30, and 100 g/L (salty groundwater); distilled water was used as a control treatment. Results indicated that for the experimental homogeneous loam, the average E max for the treatments supplied by salty groundwater was larger than that supplied by distilled water. Furthermore, during the prediction of the Gardner-model-based E max, ignoring b and including b always led to an overestimate and underestimate, respectively, compared to the observed E max. However, the maximum upward flux calculated including b (i.e. E bmax) had higher accuracy than that ignoring b for E max prediction. Moreover, the impact of ignoring b on E max gradually weakened with increasing b value. This research helps to reveal the groundwater evaporation mechanism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hydrogeology Journal Springer Journals

Simplification of the Gardner model: effects on maximum upward flux in the presence of a shallow water table

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Earth Sciences; Hydrogeology; Hydrology/Water Resources; Geology; Water Quality/Water Pollution; Geophysics/Geodesy; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
1431-2174
eISSN
1435-0157
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10040-018-1733-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The maximum upward flux (E max) is a control condition for the development of groundwater evaporation models, which can be predicted through the Gardner model. A high-precision E max prediction helps to improve irrigation practice. When using the Gardner model, it has widely been accepted to ignore parameter b (a soil-water constant) for model simplification. However, this may affect the prediction accuracy; therefore, how parameter b affects E max requires detailed investigation. An indoor one-dimensional soil-column evaporation experiment was conducted to observe E max in the presence of a water table of depth 50 cm. The study consisted of 13 treatments based on four solutes and three concentrations in groundwater: KCl, NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2, with concentrations of 5, 30, and 100 g/L (salty groundwater); distilled water was used as a control treatment. Results indicated that for the experimental homogeneous loam, the average E max for the treatments supplied by salty groundwater was larger than that supplied by distilled water. Furthermore, during the prediction of the Gardner-model-based E max, ignoring b and including b always led to an overestimate and underestimate, respectively, compared to the observed E max. However, the maximum upward flux calculated including b (i.e. E bmax) had higher accuracy than that ignoring b for E max prediction. Moreover, the impact of ignoring b on E max gradually weakened with increasing b value. This research helps to reveal the groundwater evaporation mechanism.

Journal

Hydrogeology JournalSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 26, 2018

References

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