Similar but not the same: metal concentrations in hair of three ecologically similar, forest-dwelling bat species (Myotis bechsteinii, Myotis nattereri, and Plecotus auritus)

Similar but not the same: metal concentrations in hair of three ecologically similar,... Recently, a number of studies demonstrated the suitability of hair analysis to assess metal exposure of bats. As many bat species are endangered, such a non-destructive method is particularly suited for this taxon. The present study analyzed the levels of two non-essential (cadmium and lead) and four essential metals (copper, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc) in hairs of three ecologically similar, sympatric bat species, Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii), Natterer’s bat (Myotis nattereri), and Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) from an area in Central Hesse (Germany), as well as metal concentrations in soil samples from the bats’ foraging habitats. Applying a previously established protocol, the analyses were performed using microwave-assisted extraction followed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Cadmium and lead concentrations in hair did not differ significantly among the three studied species, whereas the following significant differences existed for levels of essential metals in hair. Manganese concentrations in hair were higher in M. bechsteinii and P. auritus than in M. nattereri and Cu concentrations were higher in M. nattereri than in P. auritus. Myotis bechsteinii showed higher Zn concentrations compared to P. auritus and lower Mo concentrations compared to M. nattereri. Reasons for the observed differences among the three studied species could be differential exposure to these metal elements in their foraging areas, related to variation in the species composition of their arthropod diet in combination with different metal levels in the respective prey species, and/or species-specific requirements for essential metals and related variation in physiological regulation of these elements in the bats. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Similar but not the same: metal concentrations in hair of three ecologically similar, forest-dwelling bat species (Myotis bechsteinii, Myotis nattereri, and Plecotus auritus)

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-0884-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recently, a number of studies demonstrated the suitability of hair analysis to assess metal exposure of bats. As many bat species are endangered, such a non-destructive method is particularly suited for this taxon. The present study analyzed the levels of two non-essential (cadmium and lead) and four essential metals (copper, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc) in hairs of three ecologically similar, sympatric bat species, Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii), Natterer’s bat (Myotis nattereri), and Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) from an area in Central Hesse (Germany), as well as metal concentrations in soil samples from the bats’ foraging habitats. Applying a previously established protocol, the analyses were performed using microwave-assisted extraction followed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Cadmium and lead concentrations in hair did not differ significantly among the three studied species, whereas the following significant differences existed for levels of essential metals in hair. Manganese concentrations in hair were higher in M. bechsteinii and P. auritus than in M. nattereri and Cu concentrations were higher in M. nattereri than in P. auritus. Myotis bechsteinii showed higher Zn concentrations compared to P. auritus and lower Mo concentrations compared to M. nattereri. Reasons for the observed differences among the three studied species could be differential exposure to these metal elements in their foraging areas, related to variation in the species composition of their arthropod diet in combination with different metal levels in the respective prey species, and/or species-specific requirements for essential metals and related variation in physiological regulation of these elements in the bats.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 6, 2017

References

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