Should Low- and Middle-Income Countries Adopt Clinical Guidelines Developed in ‘Rich’ Countries?

Should Low- and Middle-Income Countries Adopt Clinical Guidelines Developed in ‘Rich’ Countries? PharmacoEconomics (2018) 36:731–732 https://doi.org/10.1007/s40273-018-0666-x EDITORIAL Should Low- and Middle-Income Countries Adopt Clinical Guidelines Developed in ‘Rich’ Countries? Alan Haycox Published online: 7 June 2018 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018 I always find conferences where the latest clinical guide- relevance, clinical guidelines must explicitly take account lines are presented incredibly informative. The reaction of of the limited resources available to many LMICs whether the audience immediately enables me to distinguish clini- in terms of medical technology or new and expensive cians that practice in rich countries from those that practice drugs. Since 2010, a total of 139 new medicines have been in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Clinicians registered by the European Union and many of these ‘in- from the rich countries listen with rapt attention to ascer- novations’ were rapidly incorporated into new clinical tain how best this guideline can be incorporated into their guidelines. However, out of this total, Bulgaria publicly clinical practice. In contrast, clinicians from LMICs appear reimbursed only 44, Croatia reimbursed 27 whilst Serbia to be far less interested and perhaps even dismissive of the reimbursed only 1! [1]. Clearly, for a clinical guideline to presentation. Such a variation in response http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PharmacoEconomics Springer Journals

Should Low- and Middle-Income Countries Adopt Clinical Guidelines Developed in ‘Rich’ Countries?

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes; Quality of Life Research; Health Economics; Health Administration; Public Health
ISSN
1170-7690
eISSN
1179-2027
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40273-018-0666-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PharmacoEconomics (2018) 36:731–732 https://doi.org/10.1007/s40273-018-0666-x EDITORIAL Should Low- and Middle-Income Countries Adopt Clinical Guidelines Developed in ‘Rich’ Countries? Alan Haycox Published online: 7 June 2018 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018 I always find conferences where the latest clinical guide- relevance, clinical guidelines must explicitly take account lines are presented incredibly informative. The reaction of of the limited resources available to many LMICs whether the audience immediately enables me to distinguish clini- in terms of medical technology or new and expensive cians that practice in rich countries from those that practice drugs. Since 2010, a total of 139 new medicines have been in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Clinicians registered by the European Union and many of these ‘in- from the rich countries listen with rapt attention to ascer- novations’ were rapidly incorporated into new clinical tain how best this guideline can be incorporated into their guidelines. However, out of this total, Bulgaria publicly clinical practice. In contrast, clinicians from LMICs appear reimbursed only 44, Croatia reimbursed 27 whilst Serbia to be far less interested and perhaps even dismissive of the reimbursed only 1! [1]. Clearly, for a clinical guideline to presentation. Such a variation in response

Journal

PharmacoEconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 7, 2018

References

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