SHOK—The First Russian Wide-Field Optical Camera in Space

SHOK—The First Russian Wide-Field Optical Camera in Space Onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov is established two fast, fixed, very wide-field cameras SHOK. The main goal of this experiment is the observation of GRB optical emission before, synchronously, and after the gamma-ray emission. The field of view of each of the cameras is placed in the gamma-ray burst detection area of other devices located onboard the “Lomonosov” spacecraft. SHOK provides measurements of optical emissions with a magnitude limit of ∼ 9 – 10 m $\sim 9\mbox{--}10^{m}$ on a single frame with an exposure of 0.2 seconds. The device is designed for continuous sky monitoring at optical wavelengths in the very wide field of view (1000 square degrees each camera), detection and localization of fast time-varying (transient) optical sources on the celestial sphere, including provisional and synchronous time recording of optical emissions from the gamma-ray burst error boxes, detected by the BDRG device and implemented by a control signal (alert trigger) from the BDRG. The Lomonosov spacecraft has two identical devices, SHOK1 and SHOK2. The core of each SHOK device is a fast-speed 11-Megapixel CCD. Each of the SHOK devices represents a monoblock, consisting of a node observations of optical emission, the electronics node, elements of the mechanical construction, and the body. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Space Science Reviews Springer Journals

SHOK—The First Russian Wide-Field Optical Camera in Space

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Physics; Space Sciences (including Extraterrestrial Physics, Space Exploration and Astronautics) ; Planetology; Aerospace Technology and Astronautics; Astrophysics and Astroparticles
ISSN
0038-6308
eISSN
1572-9672
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11214-017-0441-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov is established two fast, fixed, very wide-field cameras SHOK. The main goal of this experiment is the observation of GRB optical emission before, synchronously, and after the gamma-ray emission. The field of view of each of the cameras is placed in the gamma-ray burst detection area of other devices located onboard the “Lomonosov” spacecraft. SHOK provides measurements of optical emissions with a magnitude limit of ∼ 9 – 10 m $\sim 9\mbox{--}10^{m}$ on a single frame with an exposure of 0.2 seconds. The device is designed for continuous sky monitoring at optical wavelengths in the very wide field of view (1000 square degrees each camera), detection and localization of fast time-varying (transient) optical sources on the celestial sphere, including provisional and synchronous time recording of optical emissions from the gamma-ray burst error boxes, detected by the BDRG device and implemented by a control signal (alert trigger) from the BDRG. The Lomonosov spacecraft has two identical devices, SHOK1 and SHOK2. The core of each SHOK device is a fast-speed 11-Megapixel CCD. Each of the SHOK devices represents a monoblock, consisting of a node observations of optical emission, the electronics node, elements of the mechanical construction, and the body.

Journal

Space Science ReviewsSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 30, 2017

References

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