Shared Stocks of Snappers (Lutjanidae) in Australia and Indonesia: Integrating Biology, Population Dynamics and Socio-Economics to Examine Management Scenarios

Shared Stocks of Snappers (Lutjanidae) in Australia and Indonesia: Integrating Biology,... Joint Australia–Indonesia scientific workshops on the fisheries of the Arafura Sea, held in 1992 and 1994, concluded that the two countries might share stocks of the red snappers Lutjanus malabaricus and L. erythropterus and the gold-band snapper Pristipomoides multidens. At that time, no information concerning stock structure, distribution and movements of these species was available. Moreover, data on the population biology and on commercial catches were inadequate. Such data are crucial for stock assessment and for managing the stocks. Clearly, if the stocks being fished were shared, joint management would be appropriate. In order to answer the questions related to managing shared stocks, a collaborative research project was initiated by Australia (CSIRO as the lead agency) and Indonesia in 1999. The objectives were firstly, to describe the population dynamics, stock structure and biology of snappers relevant to the management of stocks shared between Australian and Indonesian fisheries; secondly, to characterize the social and financial structures of the Indonesian fishery so they could be taken into account in the development of management strategies; and thirdly, to explore ways of developing complementary management for the long term sustainability of the snapper fisheries. This project finished in 2003 and in this paper we bring together the results of the biological, genetic, population dynamics and socioeconomic research in relation to managing shared stocks in the context of managed versus unmanaged fisheries, small scale and industrial fisheries, and in both developed and developing country regulatory environments. Severe data limitations necessitated an innovative approach making use of comparative analyses, often data-poor values, and the drawing together of fishery dependent and independent data to evaluate the status of the stocks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Shared Stocks of Snappers (Lutjanidae) in Australia and Indonesia: Integrating Biology, Population Dynamics and Socio-Economics to Examine Management Scenarios

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-005-3887-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Joint Australia–Indonesia scientific workshops on the fisheries of the Arafura Sea, held in 1992 and 1994, concluded that the two countries might share stocks of the red snappers Lutjanus malabaricus and L. erythropterus and the gold-band snapper Pristipomoides multidens. At that time, no information concerning stock structure, distribution and movements of these species was available. Moreover, data on the population biology and on commercial catches were inadequate. Such data are crucial for stock assessment and for managing the stocks. Clearly, if the stocks being fished were shared, joint management would be appropriate. In order to answer the questions related to managing shared stocks, a collaborative research project was initiated by Australia (CSIRO as the lead agency) and Indonesia in 1999. The objectives were firstly, to describe the population dynamics, stock structure and biology of snappers relevant to the management of stocks shared between Australian and Indonesian fisheries; secondly, to characterize the social and financial structures of the Indonesian fishery so they could be taken into account in the development of management strategies; and thirdly, to explore ways of developing complementary management for the long term sustainability of the snapper fisheries. This project finished in 2003 and in this paper we bring together the results of the biological, genetic, population dynamics and socioeconomic research in relation to managing shared stocks in the context of managed versus unmanaged fisheries, small scale and industrial fisheries, and in both developed and developing country regulatory environments. Severe data limitations necessitated an innovative approach making use of comparative analyses, often data-poor values, and the drawing together of fishery dependent and independent data to evaluate the status of the stocks.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2005

References

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