Sexual Double Standards and Sexually Transmitted Illnesses: Social Rejection and Stigmatization of Women

Sexual Double Standards and Sexually Transmitted Illnesses: Social Rejection and Stigmatization... This study investigated the influence of sexual double standards on perceptions of targets experiencing illness. Sexual transmission was predicted to result in greater stigmatization. A Target Gender X Illness Transmission interaction was hypothesized, such that female targets with sexually transmitted illness (e.g., STI) would be stigmatized and social rejected more than male STI targets or targets with nonsexual illness (e.g., NSI). Undergraduate students from the southeastern United States (n = 151) read descriptions of targets diagnosed with an illness transmitted nonsexually or sexually. Results confirmed sexual transmission led to more negative perceptions of the illness and target; a Target Gender X Illness Transmission interaction influenced social rejection. Qualitative data demonstrated participant gender and illness transmission mode affected anticipated emotional and social reactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Sexual Double Standards and Sexually Transmitted Illnesses: Social Rejection and Stigmatization of Women

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-007-9339-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated the influence of sexual double standards on perceptions of targets experiencing illness. Sexual transmission was predicted to result in greater stigmatization. A Target Gender X Illness Transmission interaction was hypothesized, such that female targets with sexually transmitted illness (e.g., STI) would be stigmatized and social rejected more than male STI targets or targets with nonsexual illness (e.g., NSI). Undergraduate students from the southeastern United States (n = 151) read descriptions of targets diagnosed with an illness transmitted nonsexually or sexually. Results confirmed sexual transmission led to more negative perceptions of the illness and target; a Target Gender X Illness Transmission interaction influenced social rejection. Qualitative data demonstrated participant gender and illness transmission mode affected anticipated emotional and social reactions.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 17, 2007

References

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