Sex Life Satisfaction in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Descriptive and Exploratory Analysis

Sex Life Satisfaction in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Descriptive and Exploratory Analysis Nearly all of the sex life satisfaction literature has dealt with developed-country settings, and nothing has been published on sex life satisfaction in sub-Saharan Africa. Not only is sub-Saharan African a substantively relevant area in its own right, but it also provides a useful point of comparison for patterns and relations found in developed-world contexts. A brief descriptive and exploratory study of sex life satisfaction in sub-Saharan Africa was conducted using the World Gallup Poll, a dataset with representative sex life satisfaction data for 31 countries and 25,483 cases. In general, there was little variation in weighted averages across countries, and most of the samples surveyed were satisfied with their sex lives, with the modal score being a perfect 10. Furthermore, what variation did exist could not be attributed to level of economic development or gender inequality. Within countries, sociodemographic associations generally comported with patterns found in other contexts: income, education, and being partnered were generally associated with sex life satisfaction, and for two of the four UN subregions (West Africa and East Africa), males were significantly more satisfied with their sex lives than women. The relationship with age demonstrated a curvilinear relationship, with the peak age of sexual satisfaction in the late 20s to early 30s depending on the geographic region. The age pattern was not due to health differences, but combining estimators after a seemingly unrelated regression suggests that 4–12% of the effect of income on sex life satisfaction was attributable to better health. In general, religiosity and perceived gravity of the HIV/AIDS problem in one’s country were not significantly related to sexual satisfaction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Sexual Behavior Springer Journals

Sex Life Satisfaction in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Descriptive and Exploratory Analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Psychology; Sexual Behavior; Public Health; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0004-0002
eISSN
1573-2800
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10508-017-0984-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nearly all of the sex life satisfaction literature has dealt with developed-country settings, and nothing has been published on sex life satisfaction in sub-Saharan Africa. Not only is sub-Saharan African a substantively relevant area in its own right, but it also provides a useful point of comparison for patterns and relations found in developed-world contexts. A brief descriptive and exploratory study of sex life satisfaction in sub-Saharan Africa was conducted using the World Gallup Poll, a dataset with representative sex life satisfaction data for 31 countries and 25,483 cases. In general, there was little variation in weighted averages across countries, and most of the samples surveyed were satisfied with their sex lives, with the modal score being a perfect 10. Furthermore, what variation did exist could not be attributed to level of economic development or gender inequality. Within countries, sociodemographic associations generally comported with patterns found in other contexts: income, education, and being partnered were generally associated with sex life satisfaction, and for two of the four UN subregions (West Africa and East Africa), males were significantly more satisfied with their sex lives than women. The relationship with age demonstrated a curvilinear relationship, with the peak age of sexual satisfaction in the late 20s to early 30s depending on the geographic region. The age pattern was not due to health differences, but combining estimators after a seemingly unrelated regression suggests that 4–12% of the effect of income on sex life satisfaction was attributable to better health. In general, religiosity and perceived gravity of the HIV/AIDS problem in one’s country were not significantly related to sexual satisfaction.

Journal

Archives of Sexual BehaviorSpringer Journals

Published: May 8, 2017

References

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