Sex Determination in Freshwater Eels and Management Options for Manipulation of Sex

Sex Determination in Freshwater Eels and Management Options for Manipulation of Sex Catadromous eels enter fresh water as sexually undifferentiated glass eels and develop into males and females before migrating back to sea as silver eels. Females develop ovaries directly from the ambiguous primordial gonad whereas males pass through a transitional intersexual stage before developing testes. Eels have sex-specific life-history strategies. Males may grow faster than females initially, but this difference is soon reversed and females attain a greater age- and size-at-metamorphosis than males. Male fitness is maximized by maturing at the smallest size that allows a successful spawning migration (a time-minimizing strategy) whereas females adopt a more flexible size-maximizing strategy that trades off pre-reproductive mortality against fecundity. Although heteromorphic sex chromosomes have been identified in some species, the sex of developing gonads is labile and gender is determined principally by environmental factors. Individuals experiencing rapid growth prior to gonad differentiation tend to develop as males, whereas eels that grow slowly initially are more likely to develop as females. Paradoxically, males tend to predominate under conditions of high density, which may be because a male “grow quickly, mature early” strategy increases an individual’s chances of survival during periods of intraspecific competition. High temperatures and saline conditions have also been proposed to favor development as males but experimental studies have failed to demonstrate a clear effect of either on sex determination. High proportions of female silver eels migrating from some upstream areas, lakes and large rivers may be due to low population density or poor conditions for growth in these habitats. Manipulating sex ratios in favor of females has the potential to increase eel production in aquaculture and to buffer natural populations against fishing pressure. Sex steroids (oestrogens and phytoestrogens) have a strong feminizing effect on undifferentiated individuals and are most effective when targeted at younger eels and administered at high doses for prolonged periods. Modifying local environmental conditions, in particular reducing eel density and limiting interference and social stress, may also promote the development of females. Further research into the timing and mechanisms of sex determination in eels is required to effectively and efficiently manipulate sex for conservation and/or economic benefit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Sex Determination in Freshwater Eels and Management Options for Manipulation of Sex

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-005-7431-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Catadromous eels enter fresh water as sexually undifferentiated glass eels and develop into males and females before migrating back to sea as silver eels. Females develop ovaries directly from the ambiguous primordial gonad whereas males pass through a transitional intersexual stage before developing testes. Eels have sex-specific life-history strategies. Males may grow faster than females initially, but this difference is soon reversed and females attain a greater age- and size-at-metamorphosis than males. Male fitness is maximized by maturing at the smallest size that allows a successful spawning migration (a time-minimizing strategy) whereas females adopt a more flexible size-maximizing strategy that trades off pre-reproductive mortality against fecundity. Although heteromorphic sex chromosomes have been identified in some species, the sex of developing gonads is labile and gender is determined principally by environmental factors. Individuals experiencing rapid growth prior to gonad differentiation tend to develop as males, whereas eels that grow slowly initially are more likely to develop as females. Paradoxically, males tend to predominate under conditions of high density, which may be because a male “grow quickly, mature early” strategy increases an individual’s chances of survival during periods of intraspecific competition. High temperatures and saline conditions have also been proposed to favor development as males but experimental studies have failed to demonstrate a clear effect of either on sex determination. High proportions of female silver eels migrating from some upstream areas, lakes and large rivers may be due to low population density or poor conditions for growth in these habitats. Manipulating sex ratios in favor of females has the potential to increase eel production in aquaculture and to buffer natural populations against fishing pressure. Sex steroids (oestrogens and phytoestrogens) have a strong feminizing effect on undifferentiated individuals and are most effective when targeted at younger eels and administered at high doses for prolonged periods. Modifying local environmental conditions, in particular reducing eel density and limiting interference and social stress, may also promote the development of females. Further research into the timing and mechanisms of sex determination in eels is required to effectively and efficiently manipulate sex for conservation and/or economic benefit.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: May 18, 2005

References

  • Effects of oestradiol-enriched diet and of feeding with porcine testicular tissue on macroscopic gonadal sex in European eels
    Anderson, D.; Boëtius, I.; Olesen Larsen, L.; Hjulmann Seidler, P.

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