Serum Levels of Trace Elements and Heavy Metals in Patients with Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke

Serum Levels of Trace Elements and Heavy Metals in Patients with Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Trace elements are essential components of biological structures, but alternatively, they can be toxic at concentrations beyond those necessary for their biological functions. Changes in the concentration of essential trace elements and heavy metals may affect acute hemorrhagic stroke. The aim of this study was to measure serum levels of essential trace elements [iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), and magnesium (Mg)] and heavy metals [cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb)] in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. Twenty-six patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke and 29 healthy controls were enrolled. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (UNICAM-929) was used to measure serum Fe, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Co, Mn and Mg concentrations. Serum Cd, Pb and Fe levels were significantly higher in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke than controls (p < 0.001), while serum Cu, Zn, Mg and Mn levels were significantly lower (all p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the groups with respect to serum Co levels (p > 0.05). We first demonstrate increased Cd, Pb, and Fe levels; and decreased Cu, Zn, Mg, and Mn levels in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. These findings may have diagnostic and prognostic value for acute hemorrhagic stroke. Further studies are required to elucidate the roles of trace elements and heavy metals in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Serum Levels of Trace Elements and Heavy Metals in Patients with Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Euratom: Turkey; European Union
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Human Physiology
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-013-9621-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Trace elements are essential components of biological structures, but alternatively, they can be toxic at concentrations beyond those necessary for their biological functions. Changes in the concentration of essential trace elements and heavy metals may affect acute hemorrhagic stroke. The aim of this study was to measure serum levels of essential trace elements [iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), and magnesium (Mg)] and heavy metals [cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb)] in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. Twenty-six patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke and 29 healthy controls were enrolled. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (UNICAM-929) was used to measure serum Fe, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Co, Mn and Mg concentrations. Serum Cd, Pb and Fe levels were significantly higher in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke than controls (p < 0.001), while serum Cu, Zn, Mg and Mn levels were significantly lower (all p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the groups with respect to serum Co levels (p > 0.05). We first demonstrate increased Cd, Pb, and Fe levels; and decreased Cu, Zn, Mg, and Mn levels in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke. These findings may have diagnostic and prognostic value for acute hemorrhagic stroke. Further studies are required to elucidate the roles of trace elements and heavy metals in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 18, 2013

References

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