Serum CCL11 level is associated with radiographic spinal damage in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

Serum CCL11 level is associated with radiographic spinal damage in patients with ankylosing... The clinical significance of C–C motif chemokine11 (CCL11) in bone metabolism in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not clearly elucidated. Thus, this cross-sectional study aimed to compare serum levels of CCL11 between patients with AS and healthy controls and to investigate the relationship between serum levels of CCL11 and radiographic spinal damage in patients with AS. We consecutively recruited 55 male patients with AS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Serum levels of CCL11, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-17, and Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) were measured with commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Radiographs were scored according to the modified Stoke ankylosing spondylitis spine score (mSASSS), and syndesmophytes were defined as mSASSS ≥ 2. The serum levels of CCL11 in AS patients with syndesmophytes were significantly higher than those in AS patients without syndesmophytes (p = 0.007) and healthy controls (p = 0.006). In AS patients, the serum levels of CCL11 were significantly and positively correlated with mSASSS (p = 0.006), number of syndesmophytes (p = 0.029). After adjusting for confounding factors, elevated serum levels of CCL11 were associated with increased mSASSS (β = 0.007, p = 0.03) and higher risk for the presence of syndesmophytes (OR 2.34 per 50 pg/ml increase, p = 0.012) in AS patients. We found that the serum level of CCL11 was associated with structural damage in patients with AS, suggesting that CCL11 may serve as a promising biomarker for new bone formation in AS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rheumatology International Springer Journals

Serum CCL11 level is associated with radiographic spinal damage in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Rheumatology
ISSN
0172-8172
eISSN
1437-160X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00296-018-4073-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The clinical significance of C–C motif chemokine11 (CCL11) in bone metabolism in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not clearly elucidated. Thus, this cross-sectional study aimed to compare serum levels of CCL11 between patients with AS and healthy controls and to investigate the relationship between serum levels of CCL11 and radiographic spinal damage in patients with AS. We consecutively recruited 55 male patients with AS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Serum levels of CCL11, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-17, and Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) were measured with commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Radiographs were scored according to the modified Stoke ankylosing spondylitis spine score (mSASSS), and syndesmophytes were defined as mSASSS ≥ 2. The serum levels of CCL11 in AS patients with syndesmophytes were significantly higher than those in AS patients without syndesmophytes (p = 0.007) and healthy controls (p = 0.006). In AS patients, the serum levels of CCL11 were significantly and positively correlated with mSASSS (p = 0.006), number of syndesmophytes (p = 0.029). After adjusting for confounding factors, elevated serum levels of CCL11 were associated with increased mSASSS (β = 0.007, p = 0.03) and higher risk for the presence of syndesmophytes (OR 2.34 per 50 pg/ml increase, p = 0.012) in AS patients. We found that the serum level of CCL11 was associated with structural damage in patients with AS, suggesting that CCL11 may serve as a promising biomarker for new bone formation in AS.

Journal

Rheumatology InternationalSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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