Sequence analysis and evaluation of the NS3/A gene region of bluetongue virus isolates from South Africa

Sequence analysis and evaluation of the NS3/A gene region of bluetongue virus isolates from South... Phylogenetic networks and sequence analysis allow a more accurate understanding of the serotypes, genetic relationships and epidemiology of viruses. Based on gene sequences of the conserved segment 10 (NS3), bluetongue virus (BTV) can be divided into five topotypes. In this molecular epidemiology study, segment 10 sequence data of 11 isolates obtained from the Virology Section of the Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, were analyzed and compared to sequence data of worldwide BTV strains available in the GenBank database. The consensus nucleotide sequences of NS3/A showed intermediate levels of variation, with the nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 79.72 % to 100 %. All 11 strains demonstrated conserved amino acid characteristics. Phylogenetic networks were used to identify BTV topotypes. The phylogeny obtained from the nucleotide sequence data of the NS3/A-encoding gene presented three major and two minor topotypes. The clustering of strains from different geographical areas into the same group indicated spatial spread of the segment 10 genes, either through gene reassortment or through the introduction of new strains from other geographical areas via trade. The effect of reassortment and genetic drift on BTV and the importance of correct serotyping to identify viral strains are highlighted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Sequence analysis and evaluation of the NS3/A gene region of bluetongue virus isolates from South Africa

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-015-2741-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phylogenetic networks and sequence analysis allow a more accurate understanding of the serotypes, genetic relationships and epidemiology of viruses. Based on gene sequences of the conserved segment 10 (NS3), bluetongue virus (BTV) can be divided into five topotypes. In this molecular epidemiology study, segment 10 sequence data of 11 isolates obtained from the Virology Section of the Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, were analyzed and compared to sequence data of worldwide BTV strains available in the GenBank database. The consensus nucleotide sequences of NS3/A showed intermediate levels of variation, with the nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 79.72 % to 100 %. All 11 strains demonstrated conserved amino acid characteristics. Phylogenetic networks were used to identify BTV topotypes. The phylogeny obtained from the nucleotide sequence data of the NS3/A-encoding gene presented three major and two minor topotypes. The clustering of strains from different geographical areas into the same group indicated spatial spread of the segment 10 genes, either through gene reassortment or through the introduction of new strains from other geographical areas via trade. The effect of reassortment and genetic drift on BTV and the importance of correct serotyping to identify viral strains are highlighted.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 2016

References

  • Transplacental infection and apparently immunotolerance induced by a wild-type bluetongue virus serotype 8 natural infection
    Clercq, K; Leeuw, I; Verheyden, B; Vandemeulebroucke, E; Vanbinst, T
  • Bluetongue virus serotype 8-associated congenital hydranencephaly in calves
    Vercauteren, G; Miry, C; Vandenbussche, F; Ducatelle, R; Heyden, S
  • Molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease virus
    Knowles, NJ; Samuel, AR

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