Self-Efficacy Among Unmarried Black Mothers and Fathers of Young Children: A Pilot Study

Self-Efficacy Among Unmarried Black Mothers and Fathers of Young Children: A Pilot Study This pilot study investigated whether participation in a psychoeducation intervention focused on co-parenting and fathers’ involvement would be associated with improvements in self-efficacy beliefs in a sample of economically disadvantaged single black mothers and the nonresident fathers of their focal 3-year-old children. Of 19 couples who participated in the study, 9 were assigned randomly to a 12-session group intervention focused on mastery experiences, social modeling, and stress reduction (experimental condition) and 10 were assigned to a one-session informational group (control condition) about the importance of biological fathers’ involvement with their young children. Between–within subjects analyses of variance showed an improvement in perceived self-efficacy for mothers in the experimental group, but not for fathers whose feelings of efficacy decreased regardless of group assignment. The implications of these findings for future evidence-based interventions and research with larger samples are discussed. Keywords Single mothers · Nonresident fathers · Self-efficacy · Psychoeducation intervention · Co-parenting · Experimental research Introduction experiences, social modeling, and persuasive forms of social influences. Intervention programs bear out the efficacy- Self-efficacy beliefs are a prominent feature of human enhancing impact of such modes of influence (Bandura et al. agency in social cognitive theory. Perceived self-efficacy— 2003). defined as the felt belief in one’s ability to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Race and Social Problems Springer Journals

Self-Efficacy Among Unmarried Black Mothers and Fathers of Young Children: A Pilot Study

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Social Sciences; Social Work; Personality and Social Psychology
ISSN
1867-1748
eISSN
1867-1756
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12552-018-9232-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This pilot study investigated whether participation in a psychoeducation intervention focused on co-parenting and fathers’ involvement would be associated with improvements in self-efficacy beliefs in a sample of economically disadvantaged single black mothers and the nonresident fathers of their focal 3-year-old children. Of 19 couples who participated in the study, 9 were assigned randomly to a 12-session group intervention focused on mastery experiences, social modeling, and stress reduction (experimental condition) and 10 were assigned to a one-session informational group (control condition) about the importance of biological fathers’ involvement with their young children. Between–within subjects analyses of variance showed an improvement in perceived self-efficacy for mothers in the experimental group, but not for fathers whose feelings of efficacy decreased regardless of group assignment. The implications of these findings for future evidence-based interventions and research with larger samples are discussed. Keywords Single mothers · Nonresident fathers · Self-efficacy · Psychoeducation intervention · Co-parenting · Experimental research Introduction experiences, social modeling, and persuasive forms of social influences. Intervention programs bear out the efficacy- Self-efficacy beliefs are a prominent feature of human enhancing impact of such modes of influence (Bandura et al. agency in social cognitive theory. Perceived self-efficacy— 2003). defined as the felt belief in one’s ability to

Journal

Race and Social ProblemsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

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