Seasonal and spatial distribution of trace metals in alpine soils of Eastern Tibetan Plateau, China

Seasonal and spatial distribution of trace metals in alpine soils of Eastern Tibetan Plateau, China The distribution of trace metals in remote alpine region is an effective way to understand the impacts of regional human activity and vegetation on the alpine ecosystem. In this study, the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the soils of Gongga Mountain, Eastern Tibetan Plateau, were investigated to reveal their seasonal and spatial distribution and enrichment state, and to decipher the effects of atmospheric deposition and vegetation on their distributions among five vegetation zones. The results showed that the concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn were higher in the O horizon than in other horizons despite the seasonal changes, whereas Cu was enriched in the C horizon. The enrichment states of the metals studied in the soils decreased in the order of Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu. Cd and Pb were mainly sourced from atmospheric deposition; Zn was from both atmospheric deposition and parent materials, whereas Cu was mainly from parent materials. Seasonally, the trace metals were generally higher in May and December but lower in September, implying the impact of vegetation on the distribution of trace metals under the plant uptake and the litter decomposition. Spatially, the higher enrichment of Cu, Pb, and Zn in the soils existed in the mixed broadleaf-coniferous forests and coniferous forests (approximately 3000 m above sea level). The results suggested that atmospheric deposition and biological processes are main factors controlling the seasonal and spatial distribution of trace metals in the soils of the remote alpine ecosystem. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Mountain Science Springer Journals

Seasonal and spatial distribution of trace metals in alpine soils of Eastern Tibetan Plateau, China

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Publisher
Science Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Earth Sciences; Earth Sciences, general; Geography, general; Environment, general; Ecology
ISSN
1672-6316
eISSN
1993-0321
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11629-016-4020-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The distribution of trace metals in remote alpine region is an effective way to understand the impacts of regional human activity and vegetation on the alpine ecosystem. In this study, the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the soils of Gongga Mountain, Eastern Tibetan Plateau, were investigated to reveal their seasonal and spatial distribution and enrichment state, and to decipher the effects of atmospheric deposition and vegetation on their distributions among five vegetation zones. The results showed that the concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn were higher in the O horizon than in other horizons despite the seasonal changes, whereas Cu was enriched in the C horizon. The enrichment states of the metals studied in the soils decreased in the order of Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu. Cd and Pb were mainly sourced from atmospheric deposition; Zn was from both atmospheric deposition and parent materials, whereas Cu was mainly from parent materials. Seasonally, the trace metals were generally higher in May and December but lower in September, implying the impact of vegetation on the distribution of trace metals under the plant uptake and the litter decomposition. Spatially, the higher enrichment of Cu, Pb, and Zn in the soils existed in the mixed broadleaf-coniferous forests and coniferous forests (approximately 3000 m above sea level). The results suggested that atmospheric deposition and biological processes are main factors controlling the seasonal and spatial distribution of trace metals in the soils of the remote alpine ecosystem.

Journal

Journal of Mountain ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 4, 2017

References

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