Salmonid inbreeding: a review

Salmonid inbreeding: a review We review the published literature oninbreeding and its consequences in salmonidfishes. Inbreeding reduces genetic variationwithin populations by decreasingheterozygosity, either through an increasedchance of sharing parental genes or a loss ofalleles from random genetic drift. Increasedinbreeding is often associated with a reductionin mean phenotypic value of one or more traitswith respect to fitness (inbreedingdepression). We identify several sources ofinbreeding in salmonids. Although inbreedingoccurs naturally, much of the evidence forinbreeding stems from direct or indirectresults of human activity. The potentialconsequences of inbreeding highlight theimportance of maintaining genetic diversity insalmonid populations. Our weak understandingof genetic interactions between cultured andwild salmonids has allowed widespread practicesthat can reduce genetic variability in naturalpopulations. Although studies have detectedinbreeding depression in salmonids, its geneticbasis has rarely been addressed in wild,anadromous salmon. The genetic basis ofinbreeding depression is complex, andevaluating its effects over the entire lifecycle remains challenging. The experimentalevidence nevertheless reinforces the importanceof maintaining genetic variation withinpopulations as a primary goal of conservationand management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals
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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1021330500365
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We review the published literature oninbreeding and its consequences in salmonidfishes. Inbreeding reduces genetic variationwithin populations by decreasingheterozygosity, either through an increasedchance of sharing parental genes or a loss ofalleles from random genetic drift. Increasedinbreeding is often associated with a reductionin mean phenotypic value of one or more traitswith respect to fitness (inbreedingdepression). We identify several sources ofinbreeding in salmonids. Although inbreedingoccurs naturally, much of the evidence forinbreeding stems from direct or indirectresults of human activity. The potentialconsequences of inbreeding highlight theimportance of maintaining genetic diversity insalmonid populations. Our weak understandingof genetic interactions between cultured andwild salmonids has allowed widespread practicesthat can reduce genetic variability in naturalpopulations. Although studies have detectedinbreeding depression in salmonids, its geneticbasis has rarely been addressed in wild,anadromous salmon. The genetic basis ofinbreeding depression is complex, andevaluating its effects over the entire lifecycle remains challenging. The experimentalevidence nevertheless reinforces the importanceof maintaining genetic variation withinpopulations as a primary goal of conservationand management.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2002

References

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