Salmon ocean migration models suggest a variety of population-specific strategies

Salmon ocean migration models suggest a variety of population-specific strategies Many species of salmon around the world migrate to open ocean environments for multiple years and then return to their natal rivers to spawn. How exactly salmon are able to execute these long distance migrations, and the impact of environmental conditions on migration behavior, is not well understood. Individual based modeling is one tool that has been used to explore salmon migration in the ocean. Although models are usually not able to confirm whether a particular behavior is used, they can rule out some behaviors as unrealistic. An extensive review of published literature suggests that there is no universal migration behavior. Behaviors that fish use to navigate depend on where they are in the ocean relative to where they are going, as well as the ocean flows and conditions along the way. Future models of salmon migration should be flexible and at an appropriate scale to capture variable oceanographic conditions and fish responses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Salmon ocean migration models suggest a variety of population-specific strategies

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-014-9343-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many species of salmon around the world migrate to open ocean environments for multiple years and then return to their natal rivers to spawn. How exactly salmon are able to execute these long distance migrations, and the impact of environmental conditions on migration behavior, is not well understood. Individual based modeling is one tool that has been used to explore salmon migration in the ocean. Although models are usually not able to confirm whether a particular behavior is used, they can rule out some behaviors as unrealistic. An extensive review of published literature suggests that there is no universal migration behavior. Behaviors that fish use to navigate depend on where they are in the ocean relative to where they are going, as well as the ocean flows and conditions along the way. Future models of salmon migration should be flexible and at an appropriate scale to capture variable oceanographic conditions and fish responses.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2014

References

  • Mean free-path length theory of predator-prey interactions: application to juvenile salmon migration
    Anderson, JJ; Gurarie, E; Zabel, RW

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