Sad or Happy? The Effects of Emotions on Stated Preferences for Environmental Goods

Sad or Happy? The Effects of Emotions on Stated Preferences for Environmental Goods A substantial literature in behavioural science and psychology shows that emotions affect human choices and values. This paper investigates whether such emotional impacts are also present in stated choice experiments for environmental goods. If this were so, it would introduce an additional element of context dependence to the welfare measures derived from such methods, and would be at odds with the rational choice model underlying welfare economics. A laboratory experiment using three different emotion treatments was combined with a stated preference choice experiment concerned with changes in coastal water quality and fish populations in New Zealand. No statistically significant effects of changes in emotional state on estimated preference parameters, willingness to pay or the randomness of choices were found. The paper concludes by questioning, why such a contrast exists with empirical findings in behavioural science. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental and Resource Economics Springer Journals

Sad or Happy? The Effects of Emotions on Stated Preferences for Environmental Goods

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s)
Subject
Economics; Environmental Economics; Environmental Law/Policy/Ecojustice; Political Economy/Economic Policy; Economics, general; Environmental Management
ISSN
0924-6460
eISSN
1573-1502
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10640-016-0048-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A substantial literature in behavioural science and psychology shows that emotions affect human choices and values. This paper investigates whether such emotional impacts are also present in stated choice experiments for environmental goods. If this were so, it would introduce an additional element of context dependence to the welfare measures derived from such methods, and would be at odds with the rational choice model underlying welfare economics. A laboratory experiment using three different emotion treatments was combined with a stated preference choice experiment concerned with changes in coastal water quality and fish populations in New Zealand. No statistically significant effects of changes in emotional state on estimated preference parameters, willingness to pay or the randomness of choices were found. The paper concludes by questioning, why such a contrast exists with empirical findings in behavioural science.

Journal

Environmental and Resource EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 18, 2016

References

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