Role of recessive and dominant mutations in adaptation the genus Rana to recent biosphere

Role of recessive and dominant mutations in adaptation the genus Rana to recent biosphere The populations of three anuran amphibian species (Amphibia, Anura) of the genus Rana (R. ridibunda Pall., R. arvalis Nilss. and R. temporaria L.) inhabiting the Yekaterinburg urban agglomeration were examined. The frequencies of two traits, morph striata and iris depigmentation, were estimated in these populations. The former trait, so-called morph striata, is phenotypically expressed as a light dorsomedial stripe. It is controlled by a dominant allele of autosomal diallelic gene striata in some species of Rana genus, exhibiting complete dominance. Striata individuals have a number of physiological features that confer them an advantage under conditions of natural and artificial geochemical anomalies. The second trait, iris depigmentation, is the result of a recessive mutation. The individuals homozygous for this trait have low viability. Thus, the dominant mutations promote rapid adaptation of their carriers. Conversely, the recessive mutations may reduce viability of an individual. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Role of recessive and dominant mutations in adaptation the genus Rana to recent biosphere

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795406070076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The populations of three anuran amphibian species (Amphibia, Anura) of the genus Rana (R. ridibunda Pall., R. arvalis Nilss. and R. temporaria L.) inhabiting the Yekaterinburg urban agglomeration were examined. The frequencies of two traits, morph striata and iris depigmentation, were estimated in these populations. The former trait, so-called morph striata, is phenotypically expressed as a light dorsomedial stripe. It is controlled by a dominant allele of autosomal diallelic gene striata in some species of Rana genus, exhibiting complete dominance. Striata individuals have a number of physiological features that confer them an advantage under conditions of natural and artificial geochemical anomalies. The second trait, iris depigmentation, is the result of a recessive mutation. The individuals homozygous for this trait have low viability. Thus, the dominant mutations promote rapid adaptation of their carriers. Conversely, the recessive mutations may reduce viability of an individual.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 17, 2006

References

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