Role of Protein Synthesis in Recovering Nitrate Reductase Activity in Wheat Leaves Exposed to Heat Stress

Role of Protein Synthesis in Recovering Nitrate Reductase Activity in Wheat Leaves Exposed to... Heating intact leaves of 14–15-day-old seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivumL.), cv. Albidum 29, for 10 min at 44–45°C brought about a decrease in nitrate reductase activity by 50–90% of the initial level. The complete recovery of the enzyme activity occurred one to two days after the plants were returned to normal temperature conditions. Darkening plants or adding cycloheximide to the nutrient medium did not interfere with the recovery of nitrate reductase activity. The plants grown in darkness or on a nitrate-free medium were devoid of nitrate reductase activity. The transfer of these plants to the light or the addition of nitrate resulted in the induction of enzyme activity. In the untreated plants, nitrate reductase activity attained the control level in 48 h; in the heated plants, this process was considerably retarded. After heating, the activity of the preexisting enzyme recovered at a higher rate than the ability for enzyme induction. This means that the reactivation of nitrate reductase occurred even when the induction of the enzyme was almost entirely suppressed. We conclude that after the short-term effect of high temperatures, the functional activity of nitrate reductase may recover without the de novosynthesis of the enzyme protein. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Role of Protein Synthesis in Recovering Nitrate Reductase Activity in Wheat Leaves Exposed to Heat Stress

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1016703901990
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Heating intact leaves of 14–15-day-old seedlings of wheat (Triticum aestivumL.), cv. Albidum 29, for 10 min at 44–45°C brought about a decrease in nitrate reductase activity by 50–90% of the initial level. The complete recovery of the enzyme activity occurred one to two days after the plants were returned to normal temperature conditions. Darkening plants or adding cycloheximide to the nutrient medium did not interfere with the recovery of nitrate reductase activity. The plants grown in darkness or on a nitrate-free medium were devoid of nitrate reductase activity. The transfer of these plants to the light or the addition of nitrate resulted in the induction of enzyme activity. In the untreated plants, nitrate reductase activity attained the control level in 48 h; in the heated plants, this process was considerably retarded. After heating, the activity of the preexisting enzyme recovered at a higher rate than the ability for enzyme induction. This means that the reactivation of nitrate reductase occurred even when the induction of the enzyme was almost entirely suppressed. We conclude that after the short-term effect of high temperatures, the functional activity of nitrate reductase may recover without the de novosynthesis of the enzyme protein.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

References

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