Role of genetic control and self-assembly in gametophyte sporoderm ontogeny: Hypotheses and experiment

Role of genetic control and self-assembly in gametophyte sporoderm ontogeny: Hypotheses and... A review of our own and literature data on the mechanisms of sporoderm (the wall of pollen grains and spores) development is presented in terms of colloidal interactions—the so-called micellar hypothesis (Gabarayeva and Hemsley, 2006; Hemsley and Gabarayeva, 2007), which suggests the participation of self-assembly processes in development. The development of exine (sporopollenin-containing part of the sporoderm) in five plant species from remote taxa has been traced in detail and interpreted as a micellar sequence. An experimental modeling of exine-like structures carried out in vitro, in which physicochemical patterns of colloidal systems (hydrophobic interactions) were the driving force, is strong evidence for the relevance of the micellar hypothesis and the promising nature of these studies. The correlation between the role of genomic control and self-assembly in the development of complex biological walls is discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Developmental Biology Springer Journals

Role of genetic control and self-assembly in gametophyte sporoderm ontogeny: Hypotheses and experiment

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Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Developmental Biology; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1062-3604
eISSN
1608-3326
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1062360414040031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A review of our own and literature data on the mechanisms of sporoderm (the wall of pollen grains and spores) development is presented in terms of colloidal interactions—the so-called micellar hypothesis (Gabarayeva and Hemsley, 2006; Hemsley and Gabarayeva, 2007), which suggests the participation of self-assembly processes in development. The development of exine (sporopollenin-containing part of the sporoderm) in five plant species from remote taxa has been traced in detail and interpreted as a micellar sequence. An experimental modeling of exine-like structures carried out in vitro, in which physicochemical patterns of colloidal systems (hydrophobic interactions) were the driving force, is strong evidence for the relevance of the micellar hypothesis and the promising nature of these studies. The correlation between the role of genomic control and self-assembly in the development of complex biological walls is discussed.

Journal

Russian Journal of Developmental BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 22, 2014

References

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