Rhythmic plant morphogenesis: Recurrent patterns of idioblast cell production

Rhythmic plant morphogenesis: Recurrent patterns of idioblast cell production Most plants are constructed from repeating modular units such as phytomers, merophytes, and cell packets. Even an organism as simple as the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena shows recurrent patterns of differentiated cellular structures, notably with respect to its heterocysts. These examples reflect the inherent rhythms established within developmental processes of living organisms. In the present article, attention is paid to repetitious production of idioblasts—isolated cells, or clusters of cells, with an identity different to that of neighbouring cells from which they are derived. In higher plant root tissues, idioblasts are contained within cell packets that grow up from mother cells during the course of a number of cycles of cell production. The heterocysts of Anabaena are also discussed; they, too, are a type of idioblast. The idioblasts of root tissues originate as small cells which result from unequal cell divisions. Such divisions are usually the final ones within a cell packet which has already undergone a number of division cycles and are characteristically located at one or both ends of a packet. The packet end walls are suggested to have a role in regulating division asymmetry. Idioblastic systems discussed are root cortical trichosclereids and diaphragm cells; in their earliest stage, the cells from which lateral root primordia arise are also considered as clusters of idioblasts because they, too, are the products of asymmetric divisions of pericyclic mother cells. The division patterns of all these idioblastic systems were modelled in a consistent way using L-systems, with the assumption that the age of a cell-packet end wall plays a special role in cell determination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Rhythmic plant morphogenesis: Recurrent patterns of idioblast cell production

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/rhythmic-plant-morphogenesis-recurrent-patterns-of-idioblast-cell-4t0nVi6jFF
Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences ; Plant Physiology
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443708020015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most plants are constructed from repeating modular units such as phytomers, merophytes, and cell packets. Even an organism as simple as the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena shows recurrent patterns of differentiated cellular structures, notably with respect to its heterocysts. These examples reflect the inherent rhythms established within developmental processes of living organisms. In the present article, attention is paid to repetitious production of idioblasts—isolated cells, or clusters of cells, with an identity different to that of neighbouring cells from which they are derived. In higher plant root tissues, idioblasts are contained within cell packets that grow up from mother cells during the course of a number of cycles of cell production. The heterocysts of Anabaena are also discussed; they, too, are a type of idioblast. The idioblasts of root tissues originate as small cells which result from unequal cell divisions. Such divisions are usually the final ones within a cell packet which has already undergone a number of division cycles and are characteristically located at one or both ends of a packet. The packet end walls are suggested to have a role in regulating division asymmetry. Idioblastic systems discussed are root cortical trichosclereids and diaphragm cells; in their earliest stage, the cells from which lateral root primordia arise are also considered as clusters of idioblasts because they, too, are the products of asymmetric divisions of pericyclic mother cells. The division patterns of all these idioblastic systems were modelled in a consistent way using L-systems, with the assumption that the age of a cell-packet end wall plays a special role in cell determination.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 20, 2011

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off