Rhizospheric bacteria with potential to degrade landfill leachate

Rhizospheric bacteria with potential to degrade landfill leachate Landfill leachate shows negative impacts to environment. Designed as a conventional treatment it may not, however, be able to reduce pollutant load to acceptable levels according to legislation and environmental laws. Therefore, complemen- tary post-treatment is often necessary for that matter, where they cooperate with conventional one. For the present work, a rhizospheric bacterium was isolated from Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb., aquatic macrophyte commonly used in wetland leachate treatment. The bacterium was isolated from rhizosphere and identified through deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing and assessed for its leachate degradation potential. Obtained biomass through bench bioreactor was freeze- dried for preserving its catalytic activity. The results suggest that the isolated bacterium is tolerant in leachate added media, −1 where it presented biomass growth of 1.1 g L after fermentation. When under enriched mineral media conditions, biomass −1 growth was higher (3.9 g L ), as expected. Once proved to be tolerant and able to grow on a media with high pollutant load (leachate), the isolated bacterium can be exploited for enhancing present landfill leachate post-treatment. Keywords Biodegradation · Biomass freeze-drying · Rhizodegradation · Rhizosphere · Environmental biotechnology Introduction organic and inorganic pollutants mainly by decreasing tur- bidity and odor (Ojoawo et al. 2015). Landfill is considered a simple, yet, low-cost option http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology Springer Journals

Rhizospheric bacteria with potential to degrade landfill leachate

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Islamic Azad University (IAU)
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Science and Engineering; Environmental Chemistry; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution; Soil Science & Conservation; Ecotoxicology
ISSN
1735-1472
eISSN
1735-2630
D.O.I.
10.1007/s13762-018-1763-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Landfill leachate shows negative impacts to environment. Designed as a conventional treatment it may not, however, be able to reduce pollutant load to acceptable levels according to legislation and environmental laws. Therefore, complemen- tary post-treatment is often necessary for that matter, where they cooperate with conventional one. For the present work, a rhizospheric bacterium was isolated from Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb., aquatic macrophyte commonly used in wetland leachate treatment. The bacterium was isolated from rhizosphere and identified through deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing and assessed for its leachate degradation potential. Obtained biomass through bench bioreactor was freeze- dried for preserving its catalytic activity. The results suggest that the isolated bacterium is tolerant in leachate added media, −1 where it presented biomass growth of 1.1 g L after fermentation. When under enriched mineral media conditions, biomass −1 growth was higher (3.9 g L ), as expected. Once proved to be tolerant and able to grow on a media with high pollutant load (leachate), the isolated bacterium can be exploited for enhancing present landfill leachate post-treatment. Keywords Biodegradation · Biomass freeze-drying · Rhizodegradation · Rhizosphere · Environmental biotechnology Introduction organic and inorganic pollutants mainly by decreasing tur- bidity and odor (Ojoawo et al. 2015). Landfill is considered a simple, yet, low-cost option

Journal

International Journal of Environmental Science and TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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