Revealing perceptual–cognitive expertise in law enforcement: an iterative approach using verbal-report, temporal-occlusion, and option-generation methods

Revealing perceptual–cognitive expertise in law enforcement: an iterative approach using... Despite the attention garnered in the media about police use of force, there have been relatively few investigations of per- ceptual–cognitive skill in law enforcement using the naturalistic-decision-making approach. In this paper, we provide an overview of a series of four studies in which we investigated experience-based differences in police officer decision making in complex, rapidly unfolding, and uncertain situations. In these naturalistic situations, decision makers must first generate—for themselves—at least one option before intervening or taking action. We sought to test hypotheses about option-generation processes derived from apparently competing theories of skilled decision making and expert sensemaking. These two theories can be considered as representing two phases of decision making: skilled decision making focuses on selecting an appropriate course of action, while expert sensemaking addresses situational assessment and diagnosis. In the studies, we employed a variety of cognitive task analysis techniques, including experiments using option-generation and temporal-occlusion methods and process tracing measures (e.g., retrospective verbal reports, video-stimulated recall). Based on the data, we conclude that the two theoretical approaches—skilled decision making and expert sensemaking—appear to be complementary rather than competing. When the situation is relatively familiar, officers can quickly recognize the situation and identify an appropriate response. However, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Cognition, Technology & Work" Springer Journals

Revealing perceptual–cognitive expertise in law enforcement: an iterative approach using verbal-report, temporal-occlusion, and option-generation methods

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Publisher
Springer London
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Computer Science; User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction; Industrial and Organizational Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Automotive Engineering; Aerospace Technology and Astronautics; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
1435-5558
eISSN
1435-5566
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10111-018-0493-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite the attention garnered in the media about police use of force, there have been relatively few investigations of per- ceptual–cognitive skill in law enforcement using the naturalistic-decision-making approach. In this paper, we provide an overview of a series of four studies in which we investigated experience-based differences in police officer decision making in complex, rapidly unfolding, and uncertain situations. In these naturalistic situations, decision makers must first generate—for themselves—at least one option before intervening or taking action. We sought to test hypotheses about option-generation processes derived from apparently competing theories of skilled decision making and expert sensemaking. These two theories can be considered as representing two phases of decision making: skilled decision making focuses on selecting an appropriate course of action, while expert sensemaking addresses situational assessment and diagnosis. In the studies, we employed a variety of cognitive task analysis techniques, including experiments using option-generation and temporal-occlusion methods and process tracing measures (e.g., retrospective verbal reports, video-stimulated recall). Based on the data, we conclude that the two theoretical approaches—skilled decision making and expert sensemaking—appear to be complementary rather than competing. When the situation is relatively familiar, officers can quickly recognize the situation and identify an appropriate response. However,

Journal

"Cognition, Technology & Work"Springer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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