Revealing Hereditary Variation of Winter Hardiness in Cereals

Revealing Hereditary Variation of Winter Hardiness in Cereals A set of cereal crops and differentiating cultivars was shown to be of utility for identifying the major abiotic factors that limit the survival of winter crops in the cold season of a particular year. With this approach, the season was identified (1997–1998, Belgorod) when the survival of cereals depended on the tolerance to anaerobiosis rather than on the frost resistance. Differentiation of common wheat cultivars with respect to this property was attributed to a locus designated Win1 (Winter hardiness 1) and localized 3.2–5.8% recombination away from the B1 (awnlessness 1) gene. Winter barley (cultivar Odesskii 165) displayed the highest tolerance to anaerobiosis in the cold season; low and intermediate tolerance was established for winter durum wheat (cultivar Alyi Parus) and winter common wheat, respectively. Frost resistance and winter hardiness type 1 proved to be determined by different genetic systems, which showed no statistical association. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive associations of frost resistance in the field (1996–1997, Belgorod) with productivity, sedimentation index (Zeleny test), plant height, and vegetation period in wheat. Statistical analysis associated frost resistance with gliadin-coding alleles of homeologous chromosomes 1 and 6 of the A, B, and D wheat genomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Revealing Hereditary Variation of Winter Hardiness in Cereals

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1023/B:RUGE.0000048666.48707.4e
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A set of cereal crops and differentiating cultivars was shown to be of utility for identifying the major abiotic factors that limit the survival of winter crops in the cold season of a particular year. With this approach, the season was identified (1997–1998, Belgorod) when the survival of cereals depended on the tolerance to anaerobiosis rather than on the frost resistance. Differentiation of common wheat cultivars with respect to this property was attributed to a locus designated Win1 (Winter hardiness 1) and localized 3.2–5.8% recombination away from the B1 (awnlessness 1) gene. Winter barley (cultivar Odesskii 165) displayed the highest tolerance to anaerobiosis in the cold season; low and intermediate tolerance was established for winter durum wheat (cultivar Alyi Parus) and winter common wheat, respectively. Frost resistance and winter hardiness type 1 proved to be determined by different genetic systems, which showed no statistical association. Correlation analysis revealed significant positive associations of frost resistance in the field (1996–1997, Belgorod) with productivity, sedimentation index (Zeleny test), plant height, and vegetation period in wheat. Statistical analysis associated frost resistance with gliadin-coding alleles of homeologous chromosomes 1 and 6 of the A, B, and D wheat genomes.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 14, 2004

References

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