Return to work and work-related disability among AML survivors

Return to work and work-related disability among AML survivors Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive, acute-onset hematological malignancy. Greater use of intensive chemotherapy (IC), supportive care, and stem cell transplantation have led to an increasing number of long-term survivors. Few studies have examined employment issues among AML survivors and to our knowledge, no study has examined the long-term effects of treatment on return to work. This study is the first to utilize a validated measure of work-related limitation and productivity (WLQ-16) to assess the long-term effects of AML treatment on employment rates, work-related limitations, and overall productivity. We examined RTW issues in 111 adult AML 1-year survivors after conventional IC. We found that, over time, the number of employed survivors increased (to 54% by 36 months) while the number of unemployed, retired, and sick leave patients decreased. Among those employed, the majority were employed full time. Employed individuals reported few work-related limitations and productivity loss scores were low, ranging from 3.47% at 18 months to 2.34% at 36 months. These data suggest that, over time, over half of AML survivors who underwent IC regain social, emotional, cognitive, and physical function sufficient to RTW with few limitations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Hematology Springer Journals

Return to work and work-related disability among AML survivors

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Hematology; Oncology
ISSN
0939-5555
eISSN
1432-0584
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00277-017-3097-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive, acute-onset hematological malignancy. Greater use of intensive chemotherapy (IC), supportive care, and stem cell transplantation have led to an increasing number of long-term survivors. Few studies have examined employment issues among AML survivors and to our knowledge, no study has examined the long-term effects of treatment on return to work. This study is the first to utilize a validated measure of work-related limitation and productivity (WLQ-16) to assess the long-term effects of AML treatment on employment rates, work-related limitations, and overall productivity. We examined RTW issues in 111 adult AML 1-year survivors after conventional IC. We found that, over time, the number of employed survivors increased (to 54% by 36 months) while the number of unemployed, retired, and sick leave patients decreased. Among those employed, the majority were employed full time. Employed individuals reported few work-related limitations and productivity loss scores were low, ranging from 3.47% at 18 months to 2.34% at 36 months. These data suggest that, over time, over half of AML survivors who underwent IC regain social, emotional, cognitive, and physical function sufficient to RTW with few limitations.

Journal

Annals of HematologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 14, 2017

References

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