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Response of fungal and plant communities to management-induced overstorey changes in montane forests of the Western Carpathians

Response of fungal and plant communities to management-induced overstorey changes in montane... The effect of forest management on biodiversity is a crucial issue for sustainable forestry and nature conservation. However, the ways in which management affects macrofungal and plant communities and diversity of mountain temperate forests still remain poorly understood. We performed a random sampling stratified by stand age and stand type on the sites of temperate montane fir–beech forests. Diversity of macrofungi and the vascular plant understorey in beech- and spruce-dominated managed stands was investigated and compared to primeval forests located in the Poľana Biosphere Reserve, Western Carpathians. Both the vascular plant and the macrofungal communities were altered by management, and the response of the macrofungal species (especially wood-inhabiting fungi) was more pronounced in terms of species composition change. Species turnover evaluation seems to be an important tool of forest natural status assessment, because alpha diversity did not change as much as species composition. Certain species of Carpathian primeval forests were confirmed as good indicators for natural forest change; others were proposed. Species pool and mean number of species per plot were the highest in unmanaged fir–beech forests, and species diversity significantly decreased in spruce plantations. The number of species decreased significantly due to the change of canopy tree species composition only in the macrofungal communities. As an outcome for forest management, we recommend keeping mixed forests involving all natural tree species and providing at least a minimal amount of dead wood necessary for wood-inhabiting organisms and leaving some area of unmanaged natural forests within complexes of managed stands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Forest Research Springer Journals

Response of fungal and plant communities to management-induced overstorey changes in montane forests of the Western Carpathians

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Forestry; Plant Sciences; Plant Ecology
ISSN
1612-4669
eISSN
1612-4677
DOI
10.1007/s10342-017-1096-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The effect of forest management on biodiversity is a crucial issue for sustainable forestry and nature conservation. However, the ways in which management affects macrofungal and plant communities and diversity of mountain temperate forests still remain poorly understood. We performed a random sampling stratified by stand age and stand type on the sites of temperate montane fir–beech forests. Diversity of macrofungi and the vascular plant understorey in beech- and spruce-dominated managed stands was investigated and compared to primeval forests located in the Poľana Biosphere Reserve, Western Carpathians. Both the vascular plant and the macrofungal communities were altered by management, and the response of the macrofungal species (especially wood-inhabiting fungi) was more pronounced in terms of species composition change. Species turnover evaluation seems to be an important tool of forest natural status assessment, because alpha diversity did not change as much as species composition. Certain species of Carpathian primeval forests were confirmed as good indicators for natural forest change; others were proposed. Species pool and mean number of species per plot were the highest in unmanaged fir–beech forests, and species diversity significantly decreased in spruce plantations. The number of species decreased significantly due to the change of canopy tree species composition only in the macrofungal communities. As an outcome for forest management, we recommend keeping mixed forests involving all natural tree species and providing at least a minimal amount of dead wood necessary for wood-inhabiting organisms and leaving some area of unmanaged natural forests within complexes of managed stands.

Journal

European Journal of Forest ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 25, 2018

References