Reproductive biology of wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, off eastern Australia

Reproductive biology of wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, off eastern Australia A dearth of basic biological information for wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, currently hinders the ability of scientists and managers to assess population sustainability and appropriately manage the dramatically increasing global catch. This study examined the gonads of 382 wahoo collected off eastern Australia during 2008–2011 to quantify their reproductive biology in the region. The overall sex ratio of the sample was 3.2:1 (females:males), however this differed significantly among fishing sectors and areas. The estimated fork length at which 50 % of female wahoo reach maturity was 1,046 mm. Similar to the Atlantic Ocean, female wahoo have a protracted summer spawning season during October-February. The mean spawning frequency of female wahoo was uncertain but may be approximately 2–3 days, with evidence of fish actively spawning on consecutive days. Batch fecundity of females was positively correlated with fish size and estimates ranged between 0.65 and 5.12 million oocytes. Relative fecundity was estimated at 122.0 (±9.7) oocytes per gram of ovary free body weight and did not differ with fish size or throughout the spawning season. Estimation of reproductive parameters such as size- and age-at-maturity may facilitate the construction of per-recruit stock assessments of wahoo in the region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Reproductive biology of wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, off eastern Australia

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-013-9304-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A dearth of basic biological information for wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, currently hinders the ability of scientists and managers to assess population sustainability and appropriately manage the dramatically increasing global catch. This study examined the gonads of 382 wahoo collected off eastern Australia during 2008–2011 to quantify their reproductive biology in the region. The overall sex ratio of the sample was 3.2:1 (females:males), however this differed significantly among fishing sectors and areas. The estimated fork length at which 50 % of female wahoo reach maturity was 1,046 mm. Similar to the Atlantic Ocean, female wahoo have a protracted summer spawning season during October-February. The mean spawning frequency of female wahoo was uncertain but may be approximately 2–3 days, with evidence of fish actively spawning on consecutive days. Batch fecundity of females was positively correlated with fish size and estimates ranged between 0.65 and 5.12 million oocytes. Relative fecundity was estimated at 122.0 (±9.7) oocytes per gram of ovary free body weight and did not differ with fish size or throughout the spawning season. Estimation of reproductive parameters such as size- and age-at-maturity may facilitate the construction of per-recruit stock assessments of wahoo in the region.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 27, 2013

References

  • Reproductive biology of wahoo, Acanthocybium solandri, from the Atlantic coast of Florida and the Bahamas
    Jenkins, KLM; McBride, RS

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