Reporting missing data: a study of selected articles published from 2003–2007

Reporting missing data: a study of selected articles published from 2003–2007 Missing data (MD) is prevalent in empirical social science research (Allison, http://books.google.ca/books?id=ZtYArHXjpB8Canddq=missing+dataandprintsec=frontcoverandsource=blandots=ziTBvDHxWbandsig=Uiy83xDbWSO4HeBSth0Q_oZIrQandhl=enandei=q6A7Su25ApnIM-eYlccOandsa=Xandoi=book_resultandct=resultandresnum , 2001; Rubin in J Am Stat Assoc 91:473–489, 1996). Furthermore, inconsistencies in the reporting and treatment of MD have been documented (Peugh and Enders in Rev Educ Res 74:525–556, 2004). The goal of the current project was to examine how MD was reported and treated in 68 studies issued from a refereed educational journal. It was observed that a fifth of the quantitative articles reviewed actually treated MD, using mainly deletion methods and only 10% of the explicit articles explained MD. Overall, MD reported or inferred averaged about 33% of cases and was commonly associated with missing subjects. Only three articles provided the actual percentages of MD. The results suggest that there may be a lack of consistency in how MD is reported and treated and that studies may remain deficient in how MD is addressed. The importance of the study was to signal tendencies in reporting and treating MD, to provide tentative explanations for such trends, to propose hypotheses for future empirical studies in the field, and to offer an initial set of practical guidelines for including addressing, explaining, and treating MD in educational research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

Reporting missing data: a study of selected articles published from 2003–2007

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11135-011-9452-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Missing data (MD) is prevalent in empirical social science research (Allison, http://books.google.ca/books?id=ZtYArHXjpB8Canddq=missing+dataandprintsec=frontcoverandsource=blandots=ziTBvDHxWbandsig=Uiy83xDbWSO4HeBSth0Q_oZIrQandhl=enandei=q6A7Su25ApnIM-eYlccOandsa=Xandoi=book_resultandct=resultandresnum , 2001; Rubin in J Am Stat Assoc 91:473–489, 1996). Furthermore, inconsistencies in the reporting and treatment of MD have been documented (Peugh and Enders in Rev Educ Res 74:525–556, 2004). The goal of the current project was to examine how MD was reported and treated in 68 studies issued from a refereed educational journal. It was observed that a fifth of the quantitative articles reviewed actually treated MD, using mainly deletion methods and only 10% of the explicit articles explained MD. Overall, MD reported or inferred averaged about 33% of cases and was commonly associated with missing subjects. Only three articles provided the actual percentages of MD. The results suggest that there may be a lack of consistency in how MD is reported and treated and that studies may remain deficient in how MD is addressed. The importance of the study was to signal tendencies in reporting and treating MD, to provide tentative explanations for such trends, to propose hypotheses for future empirical studies in the field, and to offer an initial set of practical guidelines for including addressing, explaining, and treating MD in educational research.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 4, 2011

References

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