Relationships of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress with Adherence to Self-Management Behaviors and Diabetes Measures in African American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

Relationships of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress with Adherence to Self-Management Behaviors and... This study examines the relationships of depression, anxiety, and stress with adherence to self-management behaviors and diabetes measures in 42 African American adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Participants were recruited from an outpatient clinic located in an urban area of a midsized city in the southeastern USA. The mean age of the sample was 54.9 years (SD = 9.9) and the majority of the participants were female (73.2%), high school graduates (55.3%), unemployed (70.7%), and publicly insured (77.8%). Each participant completed a demographic survey and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Adherence to self-management behaviors (physical activity, diet, and medication use) was assessed using surveys and self-reports. Glycated hemoglobin (A1c) and body mass index (BMI) were obtained from participants’ medical records at the time of the participants’ clinic visits. Depression, anxiety, and stress were not significantly correlated with self-management behaviors. Depression (r =0.38, p = 0.03), anxiety (r = 0.56, p =0.001), andstress(r =0.36, p = 0.04) were positively correlated with A1c. The greater the dietary risk assessment score, the higher the A1c (r =0.34, p = 0.05). Anxiety was the strongest correlate of A1c followed by depression, stress, and dietary risk assessment. Future studies to confirm http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities Springer Journals

Relationships of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress with Adherence to Self-Management Behaviors and Diabetes Measures in African American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Medicine/Public Health, general; Epidemiology; Quality of Life Research; Social Structure, Social Inequality
ISSN
2197-3792
eISSN
2196-8837
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40615-018-0500-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the relationships of depression, anxiety, and stress with adherence to self-management behaviors and diabetes measures in 42 African American adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Participants were recruited from an outpatient clinic located in an urban area of a midsized city in the southeastern USA. The mean age of the sample was 54.9 years (SD = 9.9) and the majority of the participants were female (73.2%), high school graduates (55.3%), unemployed (70.7%), and publicly insured (77.8%). Each participant completed a demographic survey and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale 21. Adherence to self-management behaviors (physical activity, diet, and medication use) was assessed using surveys and self-reports. Glycated hemoglobin (A1c) and body mass index (BMI) were obtained from participants’ medical records at the time of the participants’ clinic visits. Depression, anxiety, and stress were not significantly correlated with self-management behaviors. Depression (r =0.38, p = 0.03), anxiety (r = 0.56, p =0.001), andstress(r =0.36, p = 0.04) were positively correlated with A1c. The greater the dietary risk assessment score, the higher the A1c (r =0.34, p = 0.05). Anxiety was the strongest correlate of A1c followed by depression, stress, and dietary risk assessment. Future studies to confirm

Journal

Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health DisparitiesSpringer Journals

Published: May 29, 2018

References

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