Relationships Between Yield Monitor Data and Airborne Multidate Multispectral Digital Imagery for Grain Sorghum

Relationships Between Yield Monitor Data and Airborne Multidate Multispectral Digital Imagery for... Remote sensing imagery taken during a growing season not only provides spatial and temporal information about crop growth conditions, but also is indicative of crop yield. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between yield monitor data and airborne multidate multispectral digital imagery and to identify optimal time periods for image acquisition. Color-infrared (CIR) digital images were acquired from three grain sorghum fields on five different dates during the 1998 growing season. Yield data were also collected from these fields using a yield monitor. The images and the yield data were georeferenced to a common coordinate system. Four vegetation indices (two band ratios and two normalized differences) were derived from the green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) band images. The image data for the three bands and the four vegetation indices were aggregated to generate reduced-resolution images with a cell size equivalent to the combine's effective cutting width. Correlation analyses showed that grain yield was significantly related to the digital image data for each of the three bands and the four vegetation indices. Multiple regression analyses were also performed to relate grain yield to the three bands and to the three bands plus the four indices for each of the five dates. Images taken around peak vegetative development produced the best relationships with yield and explained approximately 63, 82, and 85% of yield variability for fields 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Yield maps generated from the image data using the regression equations agreed well with those from the yield monitor data. These results demonstrated that airborne digital imagery can be a very useful tool for determining yield patterns before harvest for precision agriculture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Relationships Between Yield Monitor Data and Airborne Multidate Multispectral Digital Imagery for Grain Sorghum

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1021544906167
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Remote sensing imagery taken during a growing season not only provides spatial and temporal information about crop growth conditions, but also is indicative of crop yield. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between yield monitor data and airborne multidate multispectral digital imagery and to identify optimal time periods for image acquisition. Color-infrared (CIR) digital images were acquired from three grain sorghum fields on five different dates during the 1998 growing season. Yield data were also collected from these fields using a yield monitor. The images and the yield data were georeferenced to a common coordinate system. Four vegetation indices (two band ratios and two normalized differences) were derived from the green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) band images. The image data for the three bands and the four vegetation indices were aggregated to generate reduced-resolution images with a cell size equivalent to the combine's effective cutting width. Correlation analyses showed that grain yield was significantly related to the digital image data for each of the three bands and the four vegetation indices. Multiple regression analyses were also performed to relate grain yield to the three bands and to the three bands plus the four indices for each of the five dates. Images taken around peak vegetative development produced the best relationships with yield and explained approximately 63, 82, and 85% of yield variability for fields 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Yield maps generated from the image data using the regression equations agreed well with those from the yield monitor data. These results demonstrated that airborne digital imagery can be a very useful tool for determining yield patterns before harvest for precision agriculture.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 8, 2004

References

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