Relationship Between Protein Denaturation and Water Holding Capacity of Pork During Postmortem Ageing

Relationship Between Protein Denaturation and Water Holding Capacity of Pork During Postmortem... This study investigated water holding capacity (WHC), water distribution, and protein denaturation of pork loin chops (longissimus lumborum) packaged in polyethylene bags throughout display at 4 ± 1 °C for up to 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 days. The drip loss of pork eventually increased following a decrease during the first 5 days of storage. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed an increase in population of immobilized water P22 from day 1 to day 5, meanwhile a sharp decrease after 9 days was noticed. However, an opposite trend was observed for the population of free water P23. Correlation analysis indicated that myofibrillar protein solubility was negatively correlated with drip loss (p < 0.05), whereas sarcoplasmic protein measurement were not related to drip loss (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the content of α-helices increased during the first 5 days of storage (p < 0.05), which suggested increased WHC during the earlier period of postmortem storage. During the subsequent postmortem storage, the content of α-helices decreased significantly (p < 0.05), while the β-sheets and β-turns increased. The maximum temperatures (Tmax) of three endothermic peaks were found to be 53.6 °C, 65.2 °C, and 77.6 °C at 1 day postmortem. A significant decrease were observed for Tmax peakI,Tmax peakII,Tmax peakIII at 9 d when compared to 1 d postmortem (p < 0.05), suggesting loss of thermal stability and protein denaturation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Biophysics Springer Journals

Relationship Between Protein Denaturation and Water Holding Capacity of Pork During Postmortem Ageing

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Analytical Chemistry
ISSN
1557-1858
eISSN
1557-1866
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11483-017-9507-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated water holding capacity (WHC), water distribution, and protein denaturation of pork loin chops (longissimus lumborum) packaged in polyethylene bags throughout display at 4 ± 1 °C for up to 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 days. The drip loss of pork eventually increased following a decrease during the first 5 days of storage. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed an increase in population of immobilized water P22 from day 1 to day 5, meanwhile a sharp decrease after 9 days was noticed. However, an opposite trend was observed for the population of free water P23. Correlation analysis indicated that myofibrillar protein solubility was negatively correlated with drip loss (p < 0.05), whereas sarcoplasmic protein measurement were not related to drip loss (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the content of α-helices increased during the first 5 days of storage (p < 0.05), which suggested increased WHC during the earlier period of postmortem storage. During the subsequent postmortem storage, the content of α-helices decreased significantly (p < 0.05), while the β-sheets and β-turns increased. The maximum temperatures (Tmax) of three endothermic peaks were found to be 53.6 °C, 65.2 °C, and 77.6 °C at 1 day postmortem. A significant decrease were observed for Tmax peakI,Tmax peakII,Tmax peakIII at 9 d when compared to 1 d postmortem (p < 0.05), suggesting loss of thermal stability and protein denaturation.

Journal

Food BiophysicsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 26, 2017

References

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