Regulation of the glucose supply from capillary to tissue examined by developing a capillary model

Regulation of the glucose supply from capillary to tissue examined by developing a capillary model A new glucose transport model relying upon diffusion and convection across the capillary membrane was developed, and supplemented with tissue space and lymph flow. The rate of glucose utilization (J util) in the tissue space was described as a saturation function of glucose concentration in the interstitial fluid (C glu,isf), and was varied by applying a scaling factor f to J max. With f = 0, the glucose diffusion ceased within ~20 min. While, with increasing f, the diffusion was accelerated through a decrease in C glu,isf, but the convective flux remained close to resting level. When the glucose supplying capacity of the capillary was measured with a criterion of J util /J max = 0.5, the capacity increased in proportion to the number of perfused capillaries. A consistent profile of declining C glu,isf along the capillary axis was observed at the criterion of 0.5 irrespective of the capillary number. Increasing blood flow scarcely improved the supplying capacity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiological Sciences Springer Journals

Regulation of the glucose supply from capillary to tissue examined by developing a capillary model

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Publisher
Springer Japan
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by The Physiological Society of Japan and Springer Japan
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Physiology; Neurosciences; Animal Biochemistry; Animal Physiology; Cell Physiology; Neurobiology
ISSN
1880-6546
eISSN
1880-6562
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12576-017-0538-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A new glucose transport model relying upon diffusion and convection across the capillary membrane was developed, and supplemented with tissue space and lymph flow. The rate of glucose utilization (J util) in the tissue space was described as a saturation function of glucose concentration in the interstitial fluid (C glu,isf), and was varied by applying a scaling factor f to J max. With f = 0, the glucose diffusion ceased within ~20 min. While, with increasing f, the diffusion was accelerated through a decrease in C glu,isf, but the convective flux remained close to resting level. When the glucose supplying capacity of the capillary was measured with a criterion of J util /J max = 0.5, the capacity increased in proportion to the number of perfused capillaries. A consistent profile of declining C glu,isf along the capillary axis was observed at the criterion of 0.5 irrespective of the capillary number. Increasing blood flow scarcely improved the supplying capacity.

Journal

The Journal of Physiological SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 17, 2017

References

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