Regulation of the chitinase gene expression in suspension-cultured rice cells by N-acetylchitooligosaccharides: differences in the signal transduction pathways leading to the activation of elicitor-responsive genes

Regulation of the chitinase gene expression in suspension-cultured rice cells by... Expression patterns of chitinase transcripts induced by N-acetylchitooligosaccharide elicitor were analyzed by northern blot hybridization in order to reveal a signal transduction pathway leading to the activation of class I chitinase genes (Cht-1 and Cht-3), which may play an important role in producing N-acetylchitooligosaccharide elicitor. The transcription level of both genes was enhanced in response to N-acetylchitooligosaccharides larger than pentaose at subnanomolar concentrations. These structure and dose dependencies were consistent not only with those for a 75 kDa high-affinity binding protein for N-acetylchitooligosaccharide elicitor in the plasma membrane, but also with other series of cellular responses including phytoalexin production and the expression of elicitor-responsive genes (EL2, EL3). Therefore, the elicitor signal to evoke these cellular responses including the activation of the chitinase genes could be common and transmitted into cells through the 75 kDa protein. However, the signal transduction pathway for the activation of the chitinase gene appeared to diverge from those for the other elicitor-responsive genes shortly after the signal perception. It was shown that the induction of chitinase expression by N-acetylchitooligosaccharide would require protein phosphorylation, but not de novo protein synthesis. The oxidative burst was demonstrated not to be necessary for transcriptional induction of the all four elicitor-responsive genes (Cht, PAL, EL2, EL3) by N-acetylchitooligosaccharide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Regulation of the chitinase gene expression in suspension-cultured rice cells by N-acetylchitooligosaccharides: differences in the signal transduction pathways leading to the activation of elicitor-responsive genes

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1006161802334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

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