Regulation of Metabolite Flux through Voltage-Gating of VDAC Channels

Regulation of Metabolite Flux through Voltage-Gating of VDAC Channels The mitochondrial outer membrane channel, VDAC, is thought to serve as the major permeability pathway for metabolite flux between the cytoplasm and mitochondria. The permeability of VDAC to citrate, succinate, and phosphate was studied in channels reconstituted into planar phospholipid membranes. All ions showed large changes in permeability depending on whether the channel was in the open or in the low conductance, ``closed'' state, with the closed state always more cation selective. This was especially true for the divalent and trivalent anions. Additionally, the anion flux when the voltage was zero was shown to decrease to 5–11% of the open state flux depending on the anion studied. These results give the first rigorous examination of the ability of metabolites to permeate through VDAC channels and indicate that these channels can control the flux of these ions through the outer membrane. This lends more evidence to the growing body of experiments that suggest that the outer mitochondrial membrane has a much more important role in controlling mitochondrial activity than has been thought historically. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Regulation of Metabolite Flux through Voltage-Gating of VDAC Channels

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © Inc. by 1997 Springer-Verlag New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Human Physiology
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s002329900235
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The mitochondrial outer membrane channel, VDAC, is thought to serve as the major permeability pathway for metabolite flux between the cytoplasm and mitochondria. The permeability of VDAC to citrate, succinate, and phosphate was studied in channels reconstituted into planar phospholipid membranes. All ions showed large changes in permeability depending on whether the channel was in the open or in the low conductance, ``closed'' state, with the closed state always more cation selective. This was especially true for the divalent and trivalent anions. Additionally, the anion flux when the voltage was zero was shown to decrease to 5–11% of the open state flux depending on the anion studied. These results give the first rigorous examination of the ability of metabolites to permeate through VDAC channels and indicate that these channels can control the flux of these ions through the outer membrane. This lends more evidence to the growing body of experiments that suggest that the outer mitochondrial membrane has a much more important role in controlling mitochondrial activity than has been thought historically.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1997

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